wedge


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drive a wedge between (someone or something)

To cause discord between two people or things. I used to be close friends with Tiffany, but once she started dating my ex-boyfriend, it really drove a wedge between us.
See also: drive, wedge

the thin end of the wedge

The inconspicuous beginning or initial stage of something that will be unfavorable, cause problems, or bring decline. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. This law is the thin edge of the wedge. If it's passed, you can expect more extreme legislation to follow.
See also: end, of, thin, wedge

the thin edge of the wedge

Some minor change or development that instigates or foreshadows something much larger or more impactful. Typically used in reference to that which will lead to an unfortunate, undesirable, or catastrophic outcome. These new driverless cars are just the thin edge of the wedge, if you ask me—pretty soon, every facet of our lives will be controlled by robots and automation! If we allow them to get a foothold in this territory, it could be the thin edge of the wedge that sees them stealing huge portions of our market share.
See also: edge, of, thin, wedge

drive a wedge between

someone and someone else Fig. to cause people to oppose one another or turn against one another. The argument drove a wedge between Mike and his father.
See also: drive, wedge

wedge someone or something (in) between people or things

to work someone or something into a tiny space between people or things. The usher wedged us in between two enormously fat people, and we were all very uncomfortable. They wedged in the package between Jane and the wall. We had to wedge Timmy between Jed and the side of the car.
See also: people, thing, wedge

thin edge of the wedge

A minor change that begins a major development, especially an undesirable one. For example, First they asked me to postpone my vacation for a week, and then for a month; it's the thin edge of the wedge and pretty soon it'll be a year . This term alludes to the narrow wedge inserted into a log for splitting wood. [Mid-1800s]
See also: edge, of, thin, wedge

drive a wedge between someone and someone

COMMON If someone or something drives a wedge between people who are close, they cause bad feelings between them and this causes the relationship to fail. This was all part of his plan to separate me from my daughter and drive a wedge between us. His aim was to destabilize the country by driving a wedge between the people and their government.
See also: and, drive, someone, wedge

the thin end of the wedge

BRITISH
The thin end of the wedge is the beginning of something bad which seems harmless or unimportant at present but is likely to become much worse in the future. I think it's the thin end of the wedge when you have armed police permanently on patrol round a city. This decision could prove to be the thin end of the wedge towards making the 1.68 inch ball the legal ball the world over.
See also: end, of, thin, wedge

the thin end of the wedge

an action or procedure of little importance in itself, but which is likely to lead to more serious developments. informal
See also: end, of, thin, wedge

drive a wedge between A and B

make two people become less friendly or loving towards each other: The disagreements over money finally drove a wedge between them, and they ended up getting divorced.
A wedge is a piece of wood, metal, etc. with one thick end and one thin pointed end that you use to keep two things apart or to split wood or rock.
See also: and, drive, wedge

the thin ˌend of the ˈwedge

(especially British English) used for saying that you fear that one small request, order, action, etc. is only the beginning of something larger and more serious or harmful: The government says it only wants to privatize one or two railway lines, but I think it’s the thin end of the wedge. They’ll all be privatized soon.
A wedge is a piece of wood, metal, etc. with one thick end and one thin pointed end that you use to keep two things apart or to split wood or rock.
See also: end, of, thin, wedge

wedge in

v.
To lodge or jam something or someone in some location: I accidently wedged my hat in the flue. The box was wedged in the crawl space.
See also: wedge
References in periodicals archive ?
If you like to play short game shots with the clubface open, you'll need a wedge with some relief in the heel of the clubhead.
Usually the saw is easy to dislodge, since you have your wedges and single bit axe handy.
Tan leather weaved wedges pounds 99 Mint Velvet COMPLETE THE LOOK.
REVAMP your shoe collection with a pair of black platform studded wedges, pounds 35, Wallis, left.
Reports of foot pain came from 3 6% of wedge users and 16% of controls.
At the end of 3rd month the patients using 6mm wedge insole improved in VAS at rest, walking and standing position and total WOMAC and all subscales of WOMAC, except stiffness scores, compared to the baseline values (p<0.
The new state-of-the-art complex at Sawtry, near Huntingdon, has been built for Wedge Group's subsidiary, East Anglian Galvanizing Ltd, and is the newest of the group's 14 UK hot-dip galvanizing facilities.
A wedge has a number of features that contribute to the quality and consistency of the wire bonds and loops.
On the custom end, they're a little expensive for most of our customers, but we have a few customers that dig having the ability to make a wedge any way they want it," he said.
PROBLEMS--Not being able to use a wedge type de-gate tool on some castings because of blind pockets in the gating.
Stick to wooden or raffia-based wedge heels to walk the summer trend.
WE started to talk about wedges last week when, for average club golfers, I recommended you carry a pitching wedge, a sand wedge and a lob wedge in your bag.
The wedge principal generates a clamping force relative to the size of the wedge.