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wear

tv. to tolerate something. (Usually negative.) That’s no good. I won’t wear it.
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References in classic literature ?
The women of these islands all wear boots too big for them.
Well," says the other, "I shall wear my plum-colored body to the Jones', with a yellow plastron; and they've got some lovely gloves at Puttick's, only one and eleven pence.
and with a sudden gesture he plucked forth the offending corsets from under the sofa cushion, and held them out with the expression one would wear on beholding the thumbscrews or the rack of ancient times.
I like to be tidy, and so, when I wear fussed-up things, I'm thinking of my clothes all the time, and that's tiresome.
For, being able to change her face whenever she liked, the Princess had no interest in wearing a variety of gowns, as have other ladies who are compelled to wear the same face constantly.
and which was hidden somewhere under the glossy black hair) was fiery, harsh and haughty in the extreme, and it often led the Princess to do unpleasant things which she regretted when she came to wear her other heads.
But, if you will stop to think, you will realize that a princess is sure to wear holes in her stockings, the same as other people; only it isn't considered quite polite to mention the matter.
Then you will think it wicked in me to wear it," said Celia, uneasily.
But how can I wear ornaments if you, who are the elder sister, will never wear them?
Nay, Celia, that is too much to ask, that I should wear trinkets to keep you in countenance.
Did n't your mother ever let you wear the nice things that came?
Well, he is, so you need n't laugh, for we 've made all our plans," said Maud with comical dignity as she tried the effect of an old white bonnet, wondering if farmers' wives could wear ostrich feathers when they went to meeting.
And now having got so far, my master went on to break me to harness; there were more new things to wear.
A woman wearing the same kind of clothes as people in other houses wear, told us to go up to the second floor, and she grinned at David, as if she had heard about him; so up we went, David muttering through his clenched teeth, "I sha'n't laugh," and as soon as we knocked a voice called out, "Here we are again
Ozma, especially, made much of Dorothy's relatives, for her little friend's sake, and she well knew that the awkwardness and strangeness of their new mode of life would all wear off in time.