wave

(redirected from waving)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to waving: Waving the bloody shirt

handwaving

Actions, words, or ideas that are meant to impress or appear convincing but which are in reality insubstantial or inconsequential. The governor has been doing a lot of political handwaving over the issue of immigration lately, but few suspect that anything will actually be accomplished in the coming year.

heat wave

A period of time in which the weather is unusually and persistently hot. Our summers are usually very mild here, but we've been in the midst of a heat wave recently that's made it feel like the tropics!
See also: heat, wave

ride (on) the wave (of something)

To enjoy the advantage or benefit of a particularly successful, popular, fortunate, interesting, etc., moment or period of time. Jonathan has been riding the wave of his sister's celebrity ever since she was cast in that blockbuster film series. The popular Internet artist has ridden the wave of support from her fan base to launch an incredibly successful crowd funding campaign for a new project. Ever since I won the lottery, everybody has been really friendly to me, and I've just been riding the wave ever since!
See also: ride, wave

wave goodbye to (something)

To lose or end something, especially suddenly; to be forced to accept such a loss or end. You were caught drinking on school property? Well, you can wave goodbye to your brand new car, mister! After the final horse lost its race, I waved goodbye to all the money I'd won that day at the track. You do realize that you'll be waving goodbye to all the health insurance benefits the company has to offer if you decide to work as a freelancer?
See also: goodbye, wave

wave (a/the) white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant waved the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to wave a white flag.
See also: flag, wave, white

wave the bloody shirt

To encourage violence and animosity. The phrase was especially popular during the US Civil War. Primarily heard in US. A lot of people in our country are waving the bloody shirt right now, but I just can't support acts of violence, however justified they may be.
See also: bloody, shirt, wave

be on the crest of a wave

To be experiencing a particularly successful period. Right after I got married, I got a big promotion at work, so I'm really on the crest of a wave at the moment!
See also: crest, of, on, wave

catch the next wave

To become involved with or follow the next trend. I developed my fashion sense as a teen because I got sick of always waiting to catch the next wave.
See also: catch, next, wave

catch the wave

To enjoy the advantage or benefit of a particularly successful, popular, fortunate, interesting, etc., moment or period of time. Jonathan was totally uncool at school until he caught the wave of his sister's celebrity after she was cast in that movie. The popular Internet artist caught the wave of support from her fan base to launch an incredibly successful crowd funding campaign for her new project.
See also: catch, wave

ride (on) a wave of (something)

To enjoy the advantage of or continue to benefit from a situation that is successful, fortunate, trendy, etc. Jonathan has been riding a wave of celebrity ever since he was cast in the leading role for the new blockbuster. The popular Internet artist has ridden a wave of support from her fanbase to launch an incredibly successful crowdfunding campaign for a new project.
See also: of, ride, wave

wave a magic wand

To provide the perfect solution to a given problem or difficulty, as if by magic. If I could wave a magic wand, I would just make it so the pipe had been installed properly in the first place. But I can't, so we're going to have to make a decision about how to fix it. We can't just wave a magic wand and make poverty go away. It will have to be a systematic effort by many stakeholders.
See also: magic, wand, wave

wave the flag

To stand up for, support, or defend someone or something. A number of people from the actor's hometown are arriving into New York to wave the flag at his debut performance on Broadway. My country is often a target for insults or gibes abroad, so whenever I go traveling I make a point of waving the flag for it.
See also: flag, wave

catch the next wave

 and wait for the next wave
Fig. to follow the next fad. He has no purpose in life. He sits around strumming his guitar and waiting to catch the next wave.
See also: catch, next, wave

make waves

Sl. to cause difficulty. (Often in the negative.) Just relax. Don't make waves. If you make waves too much around here, you won't last long.
See also: make, WAVES

wave at someone

 and wave to someone
to move an upraised hand in such a way as to signal recognition to someone. The people in the boat waved at us. They waved to us after we waved at them.
See also: wave

wave back (at someone)

to return someone's hand signal of greeting. I waved back at her, but she didn't see me. She didn't wave back.
See also: back, wave

wave someone back (from something)

to motion someone to move back from something. The police officer waved the curious onlookers back from the scene of the crime. The students started to go onstage, but the teacher waved them back.
See also: back, wave

wave someone or something aside

to make a signal with the hand for someone or something to move aside. The police officer waved us aside and would not let us turn into our street. The officer waved aside the spectators. She waved all the traffic aside.
See also: aside, wave

wave someone or something away (from someone or something)

to make a signal with the hand for someone or something to move away from someone or something. The officer waved us away from the intersection where we were about to turn left. The guard waved away the traffic from the intersection.
See also: away, wave

wave someone or something off

to make a signal with the hand for someone or something to remain at a distance. There was someone standing in front of the bridge, waving everyone off. The bridge must have collapsed. He waved off all the traffic.
See also: off, wave

wave someone or something on

to make a signal with the hand for someone or something to move on or keep moving. The traffic cop waved us on. The cop waved on the hordes of pedestrians.
See also: on, wave

wave something around

to raise something up and move it around so that everyone can see it. When Ruth found the money, she waved it around so everyone could see it. She kept waving around the dollar she found in the street.
See also: around, wave

make waves

Cause a disturbance or controversy, as in We've finally settled our differences, so please don't make waves. This expression alludes to causing turbulence in the water. [Slang; mid-1900s] Also see rock the boat.
See also: make, WAVES

on the crest of a wave

or

on the crest of the wave

If someone or something is on the crest of a wave or on the crest of the wave, they are experiencing great success. Founded in 1972, the group's members are confident they're on the crest of a wave. The sport at the moment is on the crest of the wave. Note: You can also say that someone is riding the crest of a wave or riding the crest of the wave. McCarthy's side looked like a team riding the crest of the wave. Note: Nouns such as success or popularity can be used instead of wave. Now, 14 years later, he is riding a crest of remarkable popularity. Note: The crest of a wave is its highest point.
See also: crest, of, on, wave

wave a magic wand

If someone waves a magic wand, they quickly and easily make things the way you want them to be. As much as I would like to, I can't solve all your problems by waving a magic wand. The fans think that you just wave a magic wand and you get money. Note: This expression is usually used to talk about things which are not possible.
See also: magic, wand, wave

catch the wave

If you catch the wave, you act quickly in order to use an opportunity, especially an opportunity to do something new. We knew we had to catch the wave now or be left behind in the future. The venture relies on catching the wave of interest generated by the Tolkien films. Note: Surfers need to catch a wave just as it breaks in order to ride it successfully.
See also: catch, wave

make waves

COMMON If you make waves, you change a situation by doing things in a very different way, often in a way that disturbs some people. Maathai has a history of making waves. In 1971 she became the first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a PhD. They are part of the new breed of furniture makers who are starting to make waves on the British scene. Note: You sometimes use this expression to suggest that this is making things better or more exciting.
See also: make, WAVES

wave aside

v.
1. To direct someone or something to stand aside by or as if by waving the hand or arm: The police waved aside the crowd. I waved my friends aside.
2. To ignore or dismiss someone or something: This review waves aside the actors' performances. The supervisor waved the new assistant aside.
See also: aside, wave

wave down

v.
To signal and cause someone or something to stop by waving the hand or arm: I waved down a cab. The stranded motorist waved a police car down.
See also: down, wave

wave off

v.
1. To dismiss or refuse something or someone by waving the hand or arm: The celebrity waved off our invitation to join our group. The bus driver waved us off and refused to stop.
2. Sports To cancel or nullify something by waving the arms, usually from a crossed position: The official waved off the goal because time had run out. The referee waved the penalty off after reviewing the play.
3. To acknowledge someone's departure by waving the hand or arm: We went down to the train station to wave off the politician. We waved our guests off at the airport.
See also: off, wave

wave on

v.
To encourage or signal someone or something to proceed by or as if by waving the hand or arm: The police officer waved the pedestrians on. The crowd waved on the runners.
See also: on, wave

wave through

v.
To direct or allow someone or something to pass through by or as if by waving the hand or arm: We slowed down at the gate, but the guard waved us through. The customs officials waved through the passengers who had no luggage.
See also: through, wave

finger wave

n. the act of giving someone the finger; displaying the middle finger upright as a sign of derision. (see also give someone the finger.) The salute turned into a finger wave when the Major turned away.
See also: finger, wave

make waves

tv. to cause difficulty. (Often in the negative.) If you make waves too much around here, you won’t last long.
See also: make, WAVES

make waves

Slang
To cause a disturbance or controversy.
See also: make, WAVES
References in classic literature ?
But, as you know, he has an extra joint in his foreflipper, and by waving it up and down and about he makes what answers to a sort of clumsy telegraphic code.
The many-colored shadows of the fairest flowers played on the pure white walls, and fountains sparkled in the sunlight, making music as the cool waves rose and fell, while to and fro, with waving wings and joyous voices, went the smiling Elves, bearing fruit and honey, or fragrant garlands for each other's hair.
cried Mordaunt, who, coming up out of the hatchway, rushed to the stern, waving his torch.
The grayness of the whole immense surface, the wind furrows upon the faces of the waves, the great masses of foam, tossed about and waving, like matted white locks, give to the sea in a gale an appearance of hoary age, lustreless, dull, without gleams, as though it had been created before light itself.
A minute later it had mounted into the sky, sailing toward the west, and the last they saw of Button-Bright he was still sitting in the middle of the shining globe and waving his sailor hat at those below.
Agafea Mihalovna went out on tiptoe; the nurse let down the blind, chased a fly out from under the muslin canopy of the crib, and a bumblebee struggling on the window-frame, and sat down waving a faded branch of birch over the mother and the baby.