waspish

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waspish

mod. in the manner of a WASP. She looks sort of “waspish,” but she’s not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Don't throw those dewy cub reporter eyes at me - it's nauseating," replies the editor waspishly, eventually agreeing to the unlikely pairing.
To Coppin's assumption that they would 'bring out all the dresses and properties for your Shakesperian [sic] productions', Kean replied that he no longer had access to such paraphernalia, adding rather waspishly that even if he had, it would be 'utterly impossible' to transport them.
Not only does the four cylinder engine sound waspishly sports car-like, but its immediacy of response puts it in a special league.
Especially when, in that age of deference and Debrett's, the show featured Lady Isobel Barnett and Lady Katie Boyle as well as the waspishly intellectual Marghanita Laski.
She starts out waspishly stiff, superficially friendly, perfectly rendered by Rossa, who tries to support her man while appeasing her soon-to-be father-in-law.
Writing some years later about "Literary Style in England and America," Waugh noted waspishly that Churchill's books, "though highly creditable, for a man with so much else to occupy him, do not really survive close attention"; but American reviewers thought differently, one after another praising the magnificence of "a great literary achievement"--and one after another making the assumption that Churchill was indeed the author.
13) Perversely, among all the rooms of Brideshead, Marchmain has chosen the red Chinese drawing-room, bedecked with murals of mandarins and Chinese landscapes, to die in (he waspishly tells Charles he "might paint it, eh--and call it 'The Death Bed'" (318).
Francis Beaumont wrote waspishly about the calibre of his detractors, accusing them of illiteracy.
Cleopatra waspishly taunting Antony, "What says the married woman?
It waspishly reports and reacts to family news from their Aunt Leigh Perrot's letter.
Such combinations were powerful: he would lovingly support a young architect or student who he would feel to be sincere and engaged, but he could waspishly send a bon mot out to a member of the audience who was leaving early.
Indeed, Duncan comments waspishly on contemporary conservatives' glib equation of "freedom" with the "free" market, and like Murphy he points out the contrast with the Agrarians' radical critique of modern capitalism (p.