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put out a warrant (on someone)

 and send out a warrant (on someone)
to issue a warrant for the arrest of someone. The police put out a warrant on Max. We sent out a warrant on Lefty "Fingers" Moran at the same time.
See also: out, put, warrant

sign one's own death warrant

Fig. to do something (knowingly) that will most likely result in severe trouble. (As if one were ordering one's own execution.) I wouldn't ever gamble a large sum of money. That would be signing my own death warrant. The killer signed his own death warrant when he walked into the police station and gave himself up.
See also: death, sign, warrant

sign your own death warrant

to do something which will stop you from being successful
Usage notes: A death warrant is an official document which orders someone to be killed as a punishment.
The company signed its own death warrant by choosing to remain independent rather than going into partnership.
See sign the pledge
See also: death, sign, warrant

sign one's own death warrant

Bring about one's own downfall, do oneself irreparable harm, as in In taking his secretary to a risqué nightclub, the parish priest was signing his own death warrant . This expression may refer to acts that ensure someone's later murder, as when, in 1921, the Irish revolutionary leader Michael Collins signed the peace treaty he had negotiated with England and said, "I tell you, I have signed my death warrant." Thirteen months later Collins was assassinated by political opponents. The expression is also used hyperbolically, however, for severe repercussions or punishments. [First half of 1900s] Also see shoot oneself in the foot.
See also: death, sign, warrant
References in classic literature ?
Come, tell me the chap’s name, and I warrant me that I lead you to his clearing by a straighter path than this, for I know every sapling that grows within two miles of Templeton.
His first measure was to read the warrant aloud, taking care to give due emphasis to the most material parts, and concluding with the name of the Judge in very audible and distinct tones.
And let me see the man in all Nottinghamshire that dare disobey the warrant of our sovereign lord King Harry, for, by the shrine of Saint Edmund, I will hang him forty cubits high
of him; how that the Sheriff had a mind to serve the King's warrant upon this same rogue, though little would he mind warrant of either king or sheriff, for he was far from being a law-abiding man.
Now by the bright eyes of Nan o' the Mill, and by mine own name and that's Wat o' the Crabstaff, and by mine own mother's son, and that's myself, will I, even I, Wat o' the Crabstaff, meet this same sturdy rogue, and gin he mind not the seal of our glorious sovereign King Harry, and the warrant of the good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire, I will so bruise, beat, and bemaul his pate that he shall never move finger or toe again
Ay, marry," said the messenger, "thou art a brave lad; but our good Sheriff hath offered fourscore angels of bright gold to whosoever shall serve the warrant upon Robin Hood; though little good will it do.
In reply to this we warned him that we were acting under a legal warrant, and that he might get into trouble if he obstructed us in the execution of our duty.
Dexter, and that he was himself a lawyer, and he asked to see our warrant.
If you will warrant the beer, I will warrant the throat," said John composedly.
But we have the Sioux horses; I warrant me, that the kicking imps will swim like so many deer.
Middleton and Paul followed, pressing as nigh the bark as prudence would at all warrant.
I warrant me your legs would be a-weary before you had followed its bed into the Rocky Mountains; but then there are seasons when it might be done without wetting a foot.
But listen to the words of the Pawnee; he is a lad of spirit, and I warrant me many is the hard race that he has run with the Sioux bands.
says my old governess, jeering, 'I warrant you he has got drunk now and got a whore, and she has picked his pocket, and so he comes home to his wife and tells her he has been robbed.
Well, well,' says my governess, 'that's none of my business; if it was, I warrant I should find there was something of that kind in it; your modest men in common opinion are sometimes no better than other people, only they keep a better character, or, if you please, are the better hypocrites.