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like death warmed up

In a state or appearance of extreme ill health. (Often preceded by "look" or "feel.") A: "You had a lot to drink last night. How are you feeling this morning?" B: "Like death warmed up." You look like death warmed up, I think you should see a doctor!
See also: death, like, up, warm

housewarming (party)

A party thrown to celebrate when someone moves into a new apartment, flat, or house. We're having a little housewarming next week to get to know our neighbors and feel a bit more at home here. Are you going to the neighbor's housewarming party? I think it will be a nice way to welcome them to the neighborhood.

warm fuzzy

1. A highly sentimental, reassuring, and comforting emotional response. If all you want out of a relationship is a constant source of warm fuzzies, then you are going to have a hard time finding meaningful, long-term connections with people.
2. A thing or situation that provokes or evokes such an emotional response. Toys that people grow up with tend to become sort of warm fuzzies for them later in life.
See also: fuzzy, warm

warm and fuzzy

1. noun A highly sentimental, reassuring, and comforting emotional response. (Sometimes hyphenated.) If all you want out of a relationship is a constant source of the warm and fuzzies, then you are going to have a hard time finding meaningful, long-term connections with people. I got such warm-and-fuzzies from visiting the lake house again after so many years.
2. noun A thing or situation designed to provoke or evoke such an emotional response. (Sometimes hyphenated.) Toys that people grow up with tend to become a sort of warm-and-fuzzy for them later in life.
3. adjective Particularly sentimental, reassuring, and comforting, as of an emotional response. (Sometimes hyphenated.) My dad was never a warm-and-fuzzy type of guy, but, in his own way, he always let us know that he loved us. I love this movie, it always gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling whenever I watch it.
See also: and, fuzzy, warm

warm regards

A friendly but slightly formal valediction (used to say farewell at the end of a letter or other written message; also known as a complimentary close). I hope I'll have the chance of meeting with you again soon. Warm regards, Brian
See also: regard, warm

death warmed up

A state or appearance of extreme ill health. (Often preceded by "look like" or "feel like.") A: "You had a lot to drink last night. How are you feeling this morning?" B: "Like death warmed up." You look like death warmed up, I think you should see a doctor!
See also: death, up, warm

Cold hands, warm heart.

Prov. People whose hands are usually cold have kind and loving personalities. Nancy: I don't like holding hands with Joe. His hands are so cold. Jane: Cold hands, warm heart.
See also: cold, heart, warm

*like death warmed over

Fig. very ill; appearing very sickly. (*Typically: feel ~; look ~.) Oh dear, I feel like death warmed over. Poor Carol said you look like death warmed over.
See also: death, like, warm

*warm as toast

very warm and cozy. (*Also: as ~.) The baby will be warm as toast in that blanket. We were as warm as toast by the side of the fire.
See also: toast, warm

warm body

a person; just any person (who can be counted on to be present). See if you can get a couple of warm bodies to stand at the door and hand out programs. You mean among all these warm bodies nobody knows calculus?
See also: body, warm

warm someone or something up

to make someone or something warmer; to take the chill off someone or something. I put him by the fire to warm him up a little. We warmed up our feet before the fire. Could you warm up my coffee, please?
See also: up, warm

warm someone up

 
1. to make someone warmer. Stand by the fire and warm yourself up. Warm up the kids and then give them some cookies.
2. Fig. to help someone get physically prepared to perform in an athletic event. (As if exercising or loosening up someone's muscles.) The referee told the coach to warm his team up so the game could begin. You have to warm up the team before a game. Be sure to warm yourself up before playing.
3. Fig. to prepare an audience for another—more famous—performer. (Fig. on {2}.) A singer came out to warm us up for the main attraction. This comedian is a superb choice to warm up the audience.
See also: up, warm

warm something over

 
1. to reheat food to serve it as leftovers. I'll just warm the rest over for lunch tomorrow. Jane warmed over yesterday's turkey.
2. Fig. to bring up a matter that was thought to have been settled. (Fig. on {2}.) Please don't warm that business over again. It is settled and should remain that way. Don't warm over that matter. We have discussed it enough.
See also: warm

warm the bench

Fig. [for a player] to remain out of play during a game—seated on a bench. John spent the whole game warming the bench. Mary never warms the bench. She plays from the beginning to the end.
See also: bench, warm

warm the cockles of someone's heart

Fig. to make someone feel warm and happy. It warms the cockles of my heart to hear you say that. Hearing that old song again warmed the cockles of her heart.
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm up

 
1. [for the weather or a person] to become warmer or hotter. I think it is going to warm up next week.
2. Fig.[for someone] to become more friendly. (A warm person is a friendly person.) Todd began to warm up halfway through the conference. After he had worked therefor a while, he began to warm up.
3. and warm up for something Fig. to prepare for some kind of performance or competition. The team had to warm up before the game. They have to warm up.
See also: up, warm

warm up to someone or something

Fig. to become more fervent and earnest toward someone, something, or a group; to become more responsive and receptive to someone, a group, or something. After we talked, he began to warm up to us a little. I warmed up to the committee as the interview went on.
See also: up, warm

warmed over

not very original; rehashed. I am not interested in reading warmed over news on a computer screen. The lecture sounded sort of warmed over, but it wasn't too dull.
See also: warm

warm somebody up

also warm up somebody
to cause someone to become more relaxed and friendly It is a good idea to warm up an audience with a few amusing stories before talking about serious things. Do you think meditation might help warm him up before he gets out there to speak?
See also: up, warm

warm up (something)

also warm something up
to briefly exercise as preparation for something She warms her voice up before a concert by singing scales and making funny noises. He always warmed up for about 15 minutes before his morning run.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of warm something up (to cause the temperature of something to increase)
See also: up, warm

warm up to (somebody/something)

to begin to like or enjoy someone or something It took a couple of days for us to warm up to each other, but now we're very good friends. Some people have warmed up to the idea of extending the school year, but many still oppose it.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form warm someone up to something (to prepare someone so they will like something): I think you should warm them up to the idea, and not just surprise your parents when they get here.
See also: up, warm

warm the cockles of your heart

  (old-fashioned)
if something you see or hear warms the cockles of your heart, it makes you feel happy because it shows that people can be good and kind It's an old-fashioned romance that will warm the cockles of your heart.
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

cold hands, warm heart

Not showing one's feelings does not signify lack of feeling. For example, Dan rarely sends flowers or anything, but he's a case of cold hands, warm heart. Why a literally cold hand should indicate sympathy or affection is not really clear, but this expression has been so used since about 1900, and the Germans have an identical saying ( kalte Hand, warmes Herz).
See also: cold, heart, warm

look like death

Also, look or feel like death warmed over . Look or feel very ill or exhausted. For example, After two nights without sleep, Bill looked like death warmed over, or This cold makes me feel like death. [Colloquial; 1930s]
See also: death, like, look

warm as toast

Comfortably warm, as in It was freezing outside, but we were warm as toast in front of the fire. Despite the British custom of serving toasted bread in a rack that rapidly cools it, this idiom originated in England, at first as hot as toast (c. 1430) and by the mid-1800s in its present form.
See also: toast, warm

warm the bench

Also, ride the bench. Be a secondary or substitute participant; wait one's turn to participate. For example, I can't wait till the head of accounting retires; I've been warming the bench for years . This expression comes from such sports as baseball and football, and their standard practice of having substitute players sit on a bench in case they are needed in a game. [Slang; early 1900s]
See also: bench, warm

warm the cockles of one's heart

Gratify one, make one feel good, as in It warms the cockles of my heart to see them getting along so well. This expression uses a corruption of the Latin name for the heart's ventricles, cochleae cordis. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm up

1. Prepare for exercise or an athletic event by stretching or practicing beforehand, as in It's important to warm up before you play any sport. The idiom is also applied to musicians getting ready to perform. [Late 1800s]
2. Make enthusiastic, excited, or animated, as in He was good at warming up an audience for the main speaker. [Mid-1800s]
3. Also, warm up to. Become friendlier or more receptive toward, as in I had a hard time warming up to my mother-in-law. [Early 1800s]
4. Reach a temperature high enough to work efficiently, as in I'll go out and warm up the car. [Mid-1900s]
5. Reheat food, as in If we warm up the leftovers, we'll have enough for everyone. [Mid-1800s]
6. Approach a state of violence or confrontation, as in Racial tension was rapidly warming up. Also see heat up.
See also: up, warm

warm welcome

A hearty, hospitable reception or greeting, as in We got a very warm welcome when we finally arrived. This expression, dating from the mid-1700s, should not be confused with the similar warm reception, which from about 1700 signified a hostile welcome, as in His rivals were planning a warm reception for him.
See also: warm, welcome

warm over

v.
1. To reheat something, especially food: Let's warm over the soup from last night. I warmed the biscuits over for you.
2. To modify something old for reuse, especially out of laziness or lack of inspiration: You can't take your old novel, warm it over, and expect people to like it. The writers merely warmed over the plot of their first film for the sequel.
See also: warm

warm to

v.
1. To become more kindly or favorably disposed to someone or something: I think they are warming to my idea.
2. To make someone or something more kindly or favorably disposed to someone or something: We're trying to warm the committee to our new proposal.
3. To make someone more appealing to someone or something: The new administration is very responsive, which has warmed them to many people.
See also: warm

warm up

v.
1. To reach a comfortable and agreeable degree of heat; warm completely: I finally warmed up by sitting next to the fire.
2. To bring something or someone to a comfortable and agreeable degree of heat; warm something or someone completely: The furnace warmed up the house. The fire warmed me up.
3. To reheat some food: Can I warm up your coffee for you? I'll just warm these leftovers up when I get home.
4. To prepare for an athletic event by exercising, stretching, or practicing for a short time beforehand: We warmed up for 15 minutes before starting the match. We warmed up with a few short rallies.
5. To make someone or something ready for an event or operation: I'll go out and warm up the car so that it won't stall. The conductor warmed the orchestra up before the concert.
6. To become ready for an event or operation: How long does it take the printer to warm up? The musicians warmed up before the concert.
7. To become enthusiastic, excited, or lively: The bar doesn't warm up until about 11:00. I warmed up to the subject after I switched teachers.
8. To make someone or something enthusiastic, excited, or lively: The emcee warmed up the crowd before the band came out. It took a bit of persuading, but we finally warmed them up to the idea.
9. To become kindly disposed or friendly: The group warmed up once the business was out of the way. I didn't warm up to them until we had gone out a few times.
10. To fill someone with pleasant emotions: It warms me up to know that you are on my side.
See also: up, warm

like death warmed over

mod. horrible; deathlike. A tall, black-garbed gentleman lay there, looking like death warmed over.
See also: death, like, warm

warm body

n. just anyone who can be counted on to stay alive. See if you can get a couple of warm bodies to stand at the door and hand out programs.
See also: body, warm

warm someone up

tv. to prepare an audience for another—more famous—performer. This man Bennett is a superb choice to warm up the audience.
See also: up, warm

warmed over

mod. not very original; rehashed. I am not interested in reading warmed-over news on a computer screen.
See also: warm
References in periodicals archive ?
The warmest months on record relative to their 1981-2010 averages are October and November 2015; each was 0.
Even if 2014 had been the warmest on record, such an anomaly would hardly justify shackling humanity to a totalitarian global bureaucracy charged with treating a natural gas exhaled by humans as "pollution" in need of planetary regulation and taxation.
It was the warmest year on record for all nations and regions in the UK apart from Northern Ireland, which had its joint third warmest year behind 2007 and 2006.
If we continue a consistent departure from average for the rest of 2014, we will edge out 2010 as the warmest year on record," Jake Crouch, climatologist with the US National Climatic Data Centre, was quoted as saying.
She added: "South-west Scotland is going to have some of the warmest temperatures in the UK.
At the same time, NASA, which calculates records in a different manner, ranked last year as the seventh warmest on record, with an average temperature of 58.
The WMO said it was likely to end among the top 10 warmest years since records began in 1850.
Nineteen states recorded their warmest year, with 2012 also bringing the warmest spring season, and the warmest month (July, 76.
While 2012 was the ninth-warmest year on record, all 10 of the warmest years in the GISS analysis have occurred since 1998, continuing a trend of temperatures well above the mid-20th century average.
Washington, Safar 27, 1434, Jan 9, 2013, SPA - The United States experienced the warmest year on record in 2012, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NO) said Tuesday.
Upon announcing that Liverpool's stewards had been issued with the award for warmest welcome, the judges commented: "First impressions count and there is no reason why that should be any different for football clubs from any other attraction.
3AF above the long-term average, making it the second warmest May on record.
Hills spokesman, Rupert Adams, said: "It looks like it is going to be a long summer and, after a mild winter, 2012 could be the warmest year since records began.
36 degrees above the long-term average to make it the 11th warmest year on record.
Alex Salmond said the pandas could expect "the warmest of Scottish receptions".