warchalking


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Related to warchalking: Wardriving, Bluejacking, Bluesnarfing

warchalking

n. making a mark in a location where a wireless interconnection is available. Since more and more Wi-Fi hot spots are available, warchaulking has become rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
See a chart of warchalking symbols by visiting SM Online.
E-commerce solicitor Charlotte Colman said: 'Many people have not heard of warchalking as it is relatively new in the UK, but businesses need to familiarise themselves with it and, more importantly, protect themselves against it.
Warchalking is the act of looking for these wireless networks and placing chalk symbols on walls and pavements to let people know where they can access the network.
However, there are those who actively seek them out and it is these people who have begun the warchalking craze, leaving symbols with details of network connections for other users.
She added: 'Many argue that warchalking is not theft since theft involves taking something from someone which prevents them from using it.
Using someone's wireless network does not actually 'take' anything but warchalking can be used for harmful activities such as crashing someone's computer, looking at their files or preventing them from using the Internet.
But Ben Hammersley, a freelance writer who says he made the first chalk mark of the craze outside his house in London five weeks ago, said yesterday: ``The potential use of warchalking for hacking purposes has been highly overblown.
Jeremy Beale, head of ebusiness for the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) said: 'The CBI condemns warchalking as an implicit incitement to irresponsible and illegal acts.
But Ben Hammersley, a freelance writer who says he made the first chalk mark of the craze outside his house in London five weeks ago, retorted: 'The potential use of warchalking for hacking purposes has been highly overblown.
Warchalking was devised as a concept on June 24 by some friends of Mr Hammersley.
If you see peculiar chalk markings on buildings - and next to them groups of people huddled around laptops - then chances are they are warchalking.