walk off


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walk it off

To attempt to alleviate an injury, typically a leg or foot injury, by walking until the pain dissipates. Typically used as an imperative, sometimes one intended to be humorous. I'm sure it's only a bruise. Just walk it off. There's only a little bit of blood. Walk it off! I tried walking it off, but I really think I broke something in my foot.
See also: off, walk

walk off

1. To depart very quickly or suddenly, especially in a brusque, angry manner. He walked off in a huff when Jennifer implied that his father was a failure.
2. To alleviate or ameliorate the negative effects of injury or condition by walking around. In this usage, a noun can be used between "walk" and "off." Feeling dazed from the collision, Jack stood up and tried walking it off. You can't just walk off a gunshot wound, Dan—we need to get you to a hospital right away!
3. To lose weight or burn calories through extensive and vigorous walking. In this usage, a noun can be used between "walk" and "off." I've set a goal for myself to walk off at least 20 pounds by this summer. No thanks, I think I'll go on foot—I'd like to walk that meal off.
See also: off, walk

walk off

to walk away; to leave on foot abruptly. She didn't even say good-bye. She just walked off. He walked off and never looked back.
See also: off, walk

walk off

v.
1. To leave abruptly by walking: My friend got angry and walked off in the middle of our conversation.
2. To reduce or eliminate some pain or stiffness by walking: I pulled my leg muscle a little bit, but I walked it off. The athlete walked off the muscle cramp before the game.
3. To lose some amount of weight by walking: She walked off ten pounds. He walked five pounds off.
4. To shed the weight gained by consuming something: You'll have to walk off all that chocolate cake. If I eat this doughnut, I'll walk it off this afternoon.
5. walk off with To win some prize or award easily or unexpectedly: My student walked off with first prize.
6. walk off with To steal something: Someone walked off with my wallet.
See also: off, walk

walk off

/away with
1. To win easily or unexpectedly.
2. To steal.
See also: off, walk
References in periodicals archive ?
Uefa, the governing body, has said players who walk off the pitch during the tournament in Ukraine and Poland in protest at racial abuse will be handed a yellow card.
And if the referee feels right for us to walk off then we'll follow him.
Ferdinand believes his team-mates would have backed Eriksson if he had asked them to walk off.
So when (his brother would) saw him in half, (Johnny Eck would) stand on his hands and walk off stage.
As a player, if you see that the officials aren't handling the situation, then you are well within your rights to walk off the pitch in my opinion," The Daily Star quoted Carlisle, as saying.
A player cannot arbitrarily decide he is receiving racial abuse and walk off.
Mario Balotelli last week threatened to walk off if he suffers abuse during Italy's Euro 2012 games but Platini said the Manchester City striker would be punished for that unless the officials stop the game.
In a remarkable show of leadership, Blatter - the most powerful man in football - has declared that if England had chosen to walk off he would have offered them his full support.
NEWCASTLE midfielder Jermaine Jenas will never walk off the pitch in protest against racist fans.
BRISK WALK: One couple shunned the telly to walk off their festive feast at Draycote Water
It is going to get to a time when players just walk off.
He said: "During our game at Stoke I really thought I was going to walk off after 25 minutes.
FORMER Smiths singer morrissey has demanded the venue for his sell-out gig tonight is meat-free all day - or he will walk off stage.
Washington, Oct 15 (ANI): Bill O'Reilly's comment on the mosque near Ground Zero on the show "The View" prompted two of its co-hosts to walk off while the show was on the air.