wage

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freeze someone's wages

Fig. to hold someone's pay at its current level. The company froze everyone's wages as soon as the economy went sour.
See also: freeze, wage

The wages of sin is death.

Prov. Doing bad things can get you in a lot of trouble. Serves him right. I always said, "The wages of sin is death."
See also: death, of, sin, wage

wage something against someone or something

to carry on something against someone or a group. They waged war against the aggressors. Are you still waging your battle against your father?
See also: wage

wages of sin, the

The results or consequences of evildoing, as in She ate all of the strawberries and ended up with a terrible stomachache-the wages of sin, no doubt . This expression comes from the New Testament, where Paul writes to the Romans (6:23): "The wages of sin is death." Today it is often used more lightly, as in the example.
See also: of, wage
References in classic literature ?
These few he would have died for as, doubtless, they would have died for him; but there were none of these fighting with the British forces in East Africa, and so, sickened and disgusted by the sight of man waging his cruel and inhuman warfare, Tarzan determined to heed the insistent call of the remote jungle of his youth, for the Germans were now on the run and the war in East Africa was so nearly over that he realized that his further services would be of negligible value.
In his breast a riot of conflicting emotions were waging the first great battle which was to point the trend of the man's character--would the selfish and the base prevail, or would the noble?
Hated by his kind and by mankind, indomitable, perpetually warred upon and himself waging perpetual war, his development was rapid and one-sided.
But in the fear of admitting philosophers to power, because they are no longer to be had simple and earnest, but are made up of mixed elements; and in turning from them to passionate and less complex characters, who are by nature fitted for war rather than peace; and in the value set by them upon military stratagems and contrivances, and in the waging of everlasting wars--this State will be for the most part peculiar.
No, I did better than to attempt waging a war, in which I could not be the victor.
Not the least of these would have been a contention, always waging within it, between a tendency to dislike Mr Henry Gowan, if not to regard him with positive repugnance, and a whisper that the inclination was unworthy.