wag

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Related to wagged: waged

play (the) wag

To absent oneself or leave early from school or work when one would normally be required to be there. Primarily heard in UK. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to play the wag after lunch. Hey, Jim and I are playing wag from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you play wag, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: play, wag

wag (it)

To absent oneself or leave early (from school or work) when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just wag it after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on wagging from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you wag class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: wag

wag off

To absent oneself or leave early from school or work when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just wag off after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on wagging off from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you wag off class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you off to school every morning!
See also: off, wag

start tongues (a-)wagging

To be a source of gossip, slander, or idle speculation. Just when the dust of his previous scandal had begun to settle, the governor did something new to start tongues a-wagging across the country. Being such a media celebrity means that anything one does, no matter how banal, is enough to start tongues wagging.
See also: start, tongue

cause (some) tongues to wag

Fig. to cause people to gossip; to give people something to gossip about. The way John was looking at Mary will surely cause some tongues to wag. The way Mary was so scantily dressed will also cause tongues to wag.
See also: cause, tongue, wag

set tongues (a)wagging

Fig. to cause people to start gossiping. The affair between the boss and her accountant set tongues a wagging. If you don't get the lawn mowed soon, you will set tongues wagging in the neighborhood.
See also: set, tongue, wag

tail wagging the dog

a situation where a small part is controlling the whole of something. John was just hired yesterday, and today he's bossing everyone around. It's a case of the tail wagging the dog. Why is this small matter taking so much time? Now it's the tail wagging the dog!
See also: dog, tail, wag

wag one's chin

Rur. to talk. She loves to visit. She'll wag her chin for hours. He was on the phone, wagging his chin to his buddy.
See also: chin, wag

the tail wagging the dog

if you describe a situation as the tail wagging the dog, you mean that the least important part of a situation has too much influence over the most important part Steve thinks we should buy an orange carpet to match the lampshade but I think that would be a case of the tail wagging the dog.
See also: dog, tail, wag

set/start tongues wagging

  (informal)
if something that someone says or does sets tongues wagging, it causes people to talk about them His late-night visit to her home has set tongues wagging.
See also: set, tongue, wag

tail wagging the dog, the

A small or unimportant factor or element governing an important one; a reversal of the proper roles. For example, She found herself explaining the new therapy to her doctor-a real case of the tail wagging the dog . [c. 1900]
See also: tail, wag

tongues wag

People are gossiping. For example, Tongues wagged when another police car was parked in front of their house, or Their arrival in a stretch limousine set the neighbors' tongues wagging. This metaphoric expression transfers the rapid movement of the tongue to idle or indiscreet chatter. [Late 1500s]
See also: tongue, wag

wag one’s chin

tv. to talk or jabber; to chatter aimlessly. The two old buzzards sat on the park bench wagging their chins all afternoon.
See also: chin, wag
References in classic literature ?
When Skipper arrived, Jerry wagged his stump tail and, with ears laid back, dragged and tugged harder than ever at the thin cotton of the girl's garment.
Cherokee wagged the stump of his tail in advertisement that he understood the meaning of the blows, but that he knew he was himself in the right and only doing his duty by keeping his grip.
He wagged his tail, and sneezed, and shook his ears, and trotted back where they had left the shaggy man.
While he hammered away at his metals the Dog slept; but when, on the other hand, he went to dinner and began to eat, the Dog woke up and wagged his tail, as if he would ask for a share of his meal.
When the dog in the video wagged mostly to its left, the sign of a negative response, observer dogs tended to have faster heartbeats than when it wagged the other way or not at all.
Vallortigara and two other scientists wanted to find out if a dog's feelings affected how its tail wagged.
When the dogs saw their owners, they all wagged their tails strongly.
When shown their owners through a slat in the cage, the dogs wagged enthusiastically to the right.
She could not sit down and every time she wagged her tail she would yelp in pain.
I knew Cassie was in pain because she yelped every time she wagged her tail.
JOLLY mongrel Jake furiously wagged his tail at every opportunity.
For years, the dogs on his San Fernando Valley route wagged their tails as he approached because, instead of Mace, he carried an ample supply of dog biscuits - and generously delivered them, along with the mail.
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