wade

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Related to waded: wadded, waded through

wade across something

to walk across something covered by water. Let's wade across the stream at this point. If I wade across it, I will get wet.
See also: across, wade

wade in

 (to something)
1. to walk into an area covered by water. The horse waded right into the stream. It waded right in.
2. Fig. to get quickly and directly involved in something. (Fig. on {2}.) Don't just wade into things. Stop and think about what you are doing. Just wade in and get started.
See also: wade

wade through something

 
1. to walk with effort through a substance, such as water, mud, garbage, etc. The soldiers waded through the mud on the way to battle. They waded through the mess to get to where they were going.
2. Fig. to struggle through something with difficulty. (Fig. on {2}.) You mean I have to wade through all these applications? I have to wade through forty term papers in the next two days.
See also: wade

wade into something

also wade in
to become involved in something in a forceful and determined way She wades into a complicated project with great enthusiasm. If there's a problem, my mother is the one to wade in and try to solve it.
See also: wade

wade through something

1. to read detailed or complicated information We don't have enough staff to wade through the data. If you can wade through the ads, there's useful information here about the history of the Internet.
2. to move through a large group We waded through a crowd of thousands. The players have to wade through a sea of fans after games.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of wade (to walk in water that is not deep)
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wade in

Also, wade into. Plunge into, begin or attack resolutely and energetically, as in She waded into that pile of correspondence. This idiom transfers entering water to beginning some action. [Mid-1800s]
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wade in

v.
1. To walk into a substance, such as water, that hinders normal movement: Unable to reach the buoy from the shore, I waded in toward it.
2. To join or intervene in an ongoing conflict, debate, or controversy: The government waded in to settle the contract dispute.
See also: wade

wade into

v.
1. To walk into something, such as water, that impedes normal movement: The child waded into the ocean.
2. To join or intervene in some ongoing conflict, debate, or controversy: The government waded into the dispute and forced a resolution. The mayor waded into the debate to elaborate on a few points.
3. To become increasingly involved in some effort: The committee waded into the task.
4. To attack someone or something verbally or physically: The supervisor waded into me with a vehement attack.
See also: wade

wade through

v.
1. To walk through something, such as water, that hinders normal movement: We waded through the water.
2. To proceed through something with great difficulty or effort: I waded through a boring report.
See also: wade
References in classic literature ?
I then took off my spectacles, and waiting about an hour, till the tide was a little fallen, I waded through the middle with my cargo, and arrived safe at the royal port of Lilliput.
And with this speech the friar waded into the brook, sword in hand, where he was met halfway by the impetuous outlaw.
They ran along the bank until they were opposite to the boats, then throwing by their weapons and buffalo robes, plunged into the river, waded and swam off to the boats and surrounded them in crowds, seeking to shake hands with every individual on board; for the Indians have long since found this to be the white man's token of amity, and they carried it to an extreme.
Then they waded out--men, women, and children--through the blinding hot rain of the morning, but turned naturally for one farewell look at their homes.
It was not till I had torn off my shoes and stockings and waded to where he stood, which was well away from the dry land, that I turned and looked round.
We had waded through brooks and scrambled over hedges and walls.
The long, straight paths were barnacled with weeds; the dense, fine hedges, once prim and angular, had fattened out of all shape or form; and on the velvet sward of other days you might have waded waist high in rotten hay.
So jolly Robin gave him his sword again, which the Friar buckled to his side, and this time looked to it that it was more secure in its fastenings; then tucking up his robes once more, he took Robin Hood upon his back and without a word stepped into the water, and so waded on in silence while Robin sat laughing upon his back.
One part of it dispersed and waded knee-deep through the snow into a birch forest to the right of the village, and immediately the sound of axes and swords, the crashing of branches, and merry voices could be heard from there.
Gilbert, to be sure, was still faithful, and waded up to Green Gables every possible evening.
Then the idea that I might be out in the mud must have struck him, for he waded out a few yards in my direction, and, stooping, with his eyes searched the dim surface long and carefully.
Opposed to them, contesting the landing, were skin-clad savages, unlike Indians, however, who clustered on the beach or waded into the water to their knees.