viviparous lizard

(redirected from viviparous lizards)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

viviparous lizard

A European species of lizard, so named because the females give birth to live young (as opposed to laying eggs). Today, we're going to study the viviparous lizard.
See also: lizard
References in periodicals archive ?
Reproductive activity of three sympatric viviparous lizards at Omiltemi, Guerrero, Sierra Mache del Sur, Mexico.
As a consequence, if global warming continues at the same rate, viviparous lizards are facing extinction in the next few decades.
grandis, consistent with other fall/winter active viviparous lizards (Goldberg 1971; 2002; Smith et al.
Asynchronous spermatogenesis and biennial female cycle of the viviparous lizard Phymaturus antofagastensis (Liolaemidae): reproductive responses to high altitudes and temperate climate of Catamarca, Argentina.
The reproductive cycle of Barisia monticola: a unique variation among viviparous lizards.
According to the high elevation hypothesis for the evolution of viviparity, the proportion of viviparous lizards inhabiting high elevations should be higher than at low elevations, where oviparous lizards should be more common.
There is genetic evidence that oviparous and viviparous lizards from this location belong to a single random-mating population, as no differences in allozymes between lizards showing different parity modes were found by Mink and Sites (1996).
Viviparous lizards in lower latitudes show patterns characterized by gametogenesis, courtship, and mating in fall, gestation over winter, and birth of the offspring during the following spring (Guillette and Casas-Andreu, 1980; Mendez et al.
Differential atresia of ovarian follicles and its effect on the clutch size of two populations of the viviparous lizard Sceloporus mucronatus.
The Sceloporus grammicus species complex currently includes at least three species of small, viviparous lizards, whose ranges collectively encompass most of Mexico: S.
Other viviparous lizards can substantially modify the phenotypes, including body mass, of their offspring during gestation (Shine and Downes, 1999).
2002) species, while seasonal cycles are represented by reproduction in viviparous lizards in autumn (Guillette and Mendez-de la Cruz, 1993; Mendez-de la Cruz et al.
Ramirez-Bautista and Gutierrez-Mayen, 2003) and viviparous lizards (e.
In other viviparous lizards, pregnant females often maintain their body temperature at different levels than non-pregnant females (e.
dugesii have asynchronous testicular and ovarian cycles, suggestion that mating may occur prior to ovulation, as in other viviparous lizards of the families Scincidae (Guillette, 1993; Ramirez-Bautista et al.