virtue

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Related to virtues: Theological virtues

in virtue of (something)

Due to something; because of something; by reason of something. In virtue of your years of hard work and experience in the company, we think you would be well-suited to a managerial role within the company. I know that you feel the need to intervene in virtue of your role as a father, but you need to allow your children a greater degree of independence.
See also: of, virtue

lady of easy virtue

euphemism A prostitute. A: "I think that Lord Stewart is spending time with a lady of easy virtue." B: "No, surely not!"
See also: easy, lady, of, virtue

by virtue of (something)

Due to something; because of something; by reason of something. By virtue of your years of hard work and experience, we think you would be well-suited to a managerial role. I know that you feel the need to intervene by virtue of your role as a father, but you need to allow your children a greater degree of independence.
See also: of, virtue

extoll the virtues of (someone or something)

To highlight and praise the positive aspects of someone or something. My mother is always extolling the virtues of meditation, but it just doesn't do anything for me.
See also: extoll, of, virtue

make a virtue of necessity

To attend to an obligation with a good attitude; to make the best of a situation in which one is required to do something. There will be many times in your life where you have to do something you don't want to, so it's best to learn very early how to make a virtue of necessity.
See also: make, necessity, of, virtue

of easy virtue

Given to sexual promiscuity, especially in exchange for money. A derogatory euphemism said almost exclusively of a woman. Of course, a woman of easy virtue will be the first one to be blamed in such a situation, ostracized and condemned as she already is in the public eye. A: "I think that Lord Stewart is spending time with a lady of easy virtue." B: "No, surely not!"
See also: easy, of, virtue

by virtue of something

because of something; due to something. She's permitted to vote by virtue of her age. They are members of the club by virtue of their great wealth.
See also: of, virtue

make a virtue of necessity

Prov. to do what you have to do cheerfully or willingly. When Bill's mother became sick, there was no one but Bill to take care of her, so Bill made a virtue of necessity and resolved to enjoy their time together.
See also: make, necessity, of, virtue

Patience is a virtue.

Prov. It is good to be patient. Jill: I wish Mary would hurry up and call me back! Jane: Patience is a virtue. Fred: The doctor has kept us waiting for half an hour! If he doesn't call us into his office pretty soon, I may do something violent. Ellen: Calm down, dear. Patience is a virtue.
See also: patience, virtue

Virtue is its own reward.

Prov. You should not be virtuous in hopes of getting a reward, but because it makes you feel good to be virtuous. Bill: If I help you, will you pay me? Fred: Virtue is its own reward.
See also: own, reward, virtue

by virtue of

Also in virtue of. On the grounds of, by reason of, as in By virtue of a large inheritance she could easily afford not to work. [Early 1300s]
See also: of, virtue

make a virtue of necessity

Do the best one can under given circumstances, as in Since he can't break the contract, Bill's making a virtue of necessity. This expression first appeared in English in Chaucer's The Knight's Tale: "Then is it wisdom, as it thinketh me, to make virtue of necessity." Also see make the best of.
See also: make, necessity, of, virtue

of easy virtue

(of a woman) promiscuous.
Easy in the sense of ‘sexually compliant’ is found in Shakespeare 's Cymbeline: ‘Not a whit, Your lady being so easy’.
See also: easy, of, virtue

make a virtue of necessity

derive some credit or benefit from an unwelcome obligation.
This is a concept found in Latin in the writings of St Jerome: facis de necessitate virtutem ‘you make a virtue of necessity’. It passed into Old French (faire de necessité vertu ) and was apparently first used in English around 1374 by Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde.
1997 Spectator How important it is for humanity always to make a virtue out of necessity.
See also: make, necessity, of, virtue

a paragon of ˈvirtue

a person who is without faults; a completely perfect person: We don’t expect all election candidates to be paragons of virtue.
See also: of, virtue

by/in ˈvirtue of something

(formal) because of something: I was invited to a party at the embassy simply by virtue of being British.
See also: of, something, virtue

make a ˌvirtue of neˈcessity

act in a good or moral way, and perhaps expect praise for this, not because you chose to but because in that particular situation you had no choice
See also: make, necessity, of, virtue

ˌvirtue is its own reˈward

(saying) the reward for acting in a moral or correct way is the knowledge that you have done so, and you should not expect more than this, for example praise from other people or payment
See also: own, reward, virtue
References in periodicals archive ?
Bushlack argues that a Thomistic account of civic virtue can help Christians participate fully in the body politic without compromising their commitment to the City of God.
Bushlack, Politics for a Pilgrim Church: A Thomistic Theory of Civic Virtue, Grand Rapids/Cambridge, UK: William B.
8) Likewise, there two sets of virtues: moral virtues that typically are acquired by habituation, and theological virtues that are infused by God's grace.
This session will provide inspirational insights on introducing virtues that will illustrate the acknowledgement of Garbha Sanskar (Birth Psychology) and how cherishing the baby within the womb is important for getting an emotionally strong and morally uplifted generation.
To do so, they conceptualized virtues, or character traits, as similar to personality traits, in that they are both stable, yet susceptible to environmental influence and subject to change over time.
It asks complex qualitative questions like 'what kinds of relationships with the nonhuman world characterise a flourishing human life--and what are the virtues of character which build and nurture such relationships?
The Higher Institution of the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice launched its first publication at Umm Al-Qura University recently.
Table 1 lists the virtues (ladders) and vices (snakes) and how they affect the game, either up or down.
First, virtues are dispositional features of character: they make us good and make us do our jobs well.
In particular, he wants to analyze and emphasize what he calls virtues of "limitation-management".
4) We must note that the virtues of Dogen's good person are not systematically expounded in the text.
Value education is an integrative teaching strategy that is carefully designed to enhance the development of the great virtues and sound clinical judgment in the nurse (Tanner, 2006).
From the classical period to today, the virtues have served as a means of self-examination, a guide for self-reflection, a pattern for living a good life, and an inspiration for literary composition.
The fully virtuous person possesses at least a critical mass of the virtues, doing the appropriate thing in a wide range of circumstances.
India, May 27 -- If we say success follows virtues, it is understood that one has to be first of all deserving success.