verse in

verse in

v.
To familiarize someone with something by study or experience. Used chiefly in the passive or with a reflexive: She is versed in physics. He has versed himself in the art of fencing. The music teacher will verse the students in keeping time to a beat.
See also: verse
References in periodicals archive ?
So I had to ask myself: Wouldn't it be nice to have an application that could follow along as we sang and whisper the next verse in our ear?
In his book on Les Puys de palinod de Rouen et de Caen, Eugene de Robillard de Beaurepaire cites, for example (183) this passage of a chant royal by Jacques Minfaut, clearly inspired, not only by the name of the current president ("Prince") of the Puy, Jacques Le Lieur, but also by the verse in Matthew quoted above -- the "grand Lyeur" being only a pretext for these verbal fireworks, behind which is the distinct presence of the words of Christ.
In his numerous studies, he referred to Ahmad Zaki Abu Shadi's (1892-1955) early attempts to introduce free verse in the late 1920s.
The project also has inserted pages of verse in the Yellow Pages for some small communities, including Sun Valley.
Such a B-type verse in the on-verse should pose a problem for line division when the final monosyllable is a finite verb, adverb, pronoun, conjunction, preposition, or demonstrative adjective, in that the final monosyllable is all that separates it from an A3.
Verse-medially, the preposition to, like the possessive pronoun his, sometimes precedes the verse in which the noun it modifies appears:
It is also the standard form for dramatic verse in Italian and German.
The Italian humanist Francesco Maria Molza attempted the writing of consecutive unrhymed verse in 1514 in his translation of Virgil's Aeneid .
Thomas Sebillet cited it twice as a model of French verse in his Art poetique francoyse (1548), and Joachim Du Bellay denounced it in his La deffence et illustration de la langue francoyse (1549), furthering its notoriety among contemporary poets and connoisseurs.
The print history of "Laissez la verde couleur" tells us much about Saint-Gelais's modes of circulating his verse at a time when younger poets such as Ronsard and Du Bellay began to see the advantages of printing their verse in single-author compilations and even took care to conceive of their work in form of books.
Nonsense verse differs from other comic verse in its resistance to any rational or allegorical interpretation.