venture

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Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

If you do not take risks, you will never accomplish anything. Bill: Should I ask my boss for a promotion? Jane: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I think I'll audition for a part in that play. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
See also: gain, nothing

venture forth

 
1. Fig. to set out; to go forward; to go out cautiously. George ventured forth into the night. I think I will venture forth. It looks safe.
2. Fig. to go forth bravely. Let us venture forth and conquer the enemy. We will arm ourselves and venture forth against our foe.
See also: forth, venture

venture out (something)

 and venture out of (something)
to go out of something cautiously. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Peter ventured out of his house for only a minute into the cold. He ventured out the door for only a moment.
See also: out, venture

venture (up)on someone or something

to come upon someone or something by chance. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on. The entire expression is formal or stilted.) David ventured upon Fred, who was out looking for mushrooms. I ventured on a little shop on Maple Street that deals in old model trains.
See also: on, venture

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

something that you say which means that it is necessary to take risks in order to achieve something We tried to make television programmes that were new and different, and we weren't always successful, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.
See also: gain, nothing

nothing ventured, nothing gained

One must take risks to achieve something, as in They quit their jobs, packed up, and moved to Wisconsin, saying "nothing ventured, nothing gained." Although this adage has appeared in slightly different form since the late 1300s, it was first recorded in this form only in 1624. For another version, see no pain, no gain.
See also: gain, nothing

venture forth

v.
To proceed despite possible danger or risk: After the storm subsided, we ventured forth to assess the damage.
See also: forth, venture

venture into

v.
To proceed into something despite possible danger or risk: The explorers ventured into the dark cave.
See also: venture

venture on

or venture upon
v.
To come upon something by chance or fortune: The travelers ventured on a charming country inn. The explorers ventured upon a hidden cache of gold.
See also: on, venture

at a venture

By mere chance or fortune; at random.
See also: venture
References in classic literature ?
They prefer to hunt him on horseback, and will venture so near as sometimes to singe his hair with the flash of the rifle.
Only give a woman love, and there is nothing she will not venture, suffer, and do.
I paused at the same moment, feeling that I could venture no further without the risk of offending him.
Under such circumstances as these, to speak of my uncle's motives was to venture on very delicate ground.
You are the leader in this venture, Sir Nigel," the other answered, "and I do but ride under your banner.
As long as the prince doth me the honor to entrust this venture to me, it is for me only to give orders; and, by Saint Paul
for we must cover many a league ere we can venture to light fire or to loosen girth.
you have neither of you mentioned a word of that poor lad who deserves to be commended: to venture breaking his neck to oblige my girl was a generous-spirited action: I have learning enough to see that.
Not that the parting speech caused Amelia to philosophise, or that it armed her in any way with a calmness, the result of argument; but it was intolerably dull, pompous, and tedious; and having the fear of her schoolmistress greatly before her eyes, Miss Sedley did not venture, in her presence, to give way to any ebullitions of private grief.
I may venture to assert the same of every aspect of the story, while I confess that the particular typhoon of the tale was not a typhoon of my actual experience.
Apparently he did not, and I refrained from pointing out the impossibility to him because, since he did not venture to say that "the girl" did not live, I felt no concern at his indignation.
Having secured my boat, I took my gun and went on shore, climbing up a hill, which seemed to overlook that point where I saw the full extent of it, and resolved to venture.
They, I observe, insult us mightily with telling us of the number of women; that the wars, and the sea, and trade, and other incidents have carried the men so much away, that there is no proportion between the numbers of the sexes, and therefore the women have the disadvantage; but I am far from granting that the number of women is so great, or the number of men so small; but if they will have me tell the truth, the disadvantage of the women is a terrible scandal upon the men, and it lies here, and here only; namely, that the age is so wicked, and the sex so debauched, that, in short, the number of such men as an honest woman ought to meddle with is small indeed, and it is but here and there that a man is to be found who is fit for a woman to venture upon.
To say that the woman should be the more easy on this occasion, is to say we should be the forwarder to venture because of the greatness of the danger, which, in my way of reasoning, is very absurd.
After two or three ineffectual twitches at his dress, which he was hardy enough to venture upon, notwithstanding his dangerous humour, Mr Dennis, who burnt, for reasons of his own, to pursue the conversation, had no alternative but to sit as patiently as he could: waiting his further pleasure.