veil

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take the veil

To become a nun (and thus wear a nun's headdress). Yes, I am taking the veil and devoting my life to God.
See also: take, veil

draw a veil over (something)

To conceal something, usually by not talking about it. Can we please draw a veil over that stupid rumor about me? It's not true, but I want as few people to hear about it as possible. I tried to draw a veil over my inexperience so that the recruiter would seriously consider me for the job.
See also: draw, over, veil

lift the veil (on something)

To divulge, explain, or reveal something that was previously a secret. Our hope is that this expedition will lift the veil on the secrets of the ancient king's tomb. The celebrity's interview purports to lift the veil on her extremely private married life.
See also: lift, veil

draw a veil over

Conceal or avoid discussing something; keep from public knowledge. For example, Louise drew a veil over the accounting errors. [c. 1700]
See also: draw, over, veil

draw a veil over something

If you draw a veil over something, you deliberately do not talk about it because you want to keep it private or because it is embarrassing. It would be kinder, perhaps, to draw a veil over the party's career from 1906 to the outbreak of the War. Most of us have something in our past career over which we choose to draw a veil. Note: A veil is a piece of cloth used by a woman to cover her face.
See also: draw, over, something, veil

beyond the veil

in a mysterious or hidden place or state, especially the unknown state of existence after death.
The phrase was originally a figurative reference to the veil which concealed the innermost sanctuary of the Temple in Jerusalem; it was later taken as referring to the mysterious division between the next world and this.
See also: beyond, veil

draw a veil over

avoid discussing or calling attention to something, especially because it is embarrassing or unpleasant.
See also: draw, over, veil

take the veil

become a nun.
See also: take, veil

cast/draw/throw a ˈveil over something

(written) say nothing or no more about something unpleasant: It is kinder to draw a veil over some of his later movies.
See also: cast, draw, over, something, throw, veil
References in classic literature ?
The black veil, though it covers only our pastor's face, throws its influence over his whole person, and makes him ghostlike from head to foot.
As he stooped, the veil hung straight down from his forehead, so that, if her eyelids had not been closed forever, the dead maiden might have seen his face.
Though this sudden and startling movement of the Indian produced no sound from the other, in the surprise her veil also was allowed to open its folds, and betrayed an indescribable look of pity, admiration, and horror, as her dark eye followed the easy motions of the savage.
I looked, and down came Sagramor riding again, with his dust brushed off and is veil nicely re-arranged.
An ye are not able to see it, because of the influence of the veil, know that it is no cumbrous lance, but a sword -- and I ween ye will not be able to avoid it.
Gradually, however, the conviction came upon me that I could, by a certain concentration of thought, think the veil away, and so get a glimpse of the mysterious face--as to which the two questions, "is she pretty?
Success was partial--and fitful--still there was a result: ever and anon, the veil seemed to vanish, in a sudden flash of light: but, before I could fully realise the face, all was dark again.
I would not tell you what is behind the black veil for the world
An irregular movement in the lower part of her veil seemed to indicate that she was breathing with difficulty.
The veil left on the table in the boat-house is Clara's veil.
He felt her overpowering black eyes looking at him through her veil.
Did you see how she looked at Montbarry, when she had to lift her veil at the beginning of the service?
With which reply, Miss Squeers adjusted the bonnet and veil, which nothing but supernatural interference and an utter suspension of nature's laws could have reduced to any shape or form; and evidently flattering herself that it looked uncommonly neat, brushed off the sandwich-crumbs and bits of biscuit which had accumulated in her lap, and availing herself of John Browdie's proffered arm, descended from the coach.
All the members of that family, especially the feminine half, were pictured by him, as it were, wrapped about with a mysterious poetical veil, and he not only perceived no defects whatever in them, but under the poetical veil that shrouded them he assumed the existence of the loftiest sentiments and every possible perfection.
She had dressed herself thoroughly, down to the tying of a black veil over her face.