value

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Related to values: family values

a good value

1. Literally, that which has a high quality, quantity, or worth but is offered at a low or reasonable price; a bargain. $1.50 for a sirloin steak? What a good value!
2. An affable, charismatic, and/or entertaining person. Primarily heard in Australia. John's a good value, he's so much fun to have at parties.
See also: good, value

be taken at face value

To be accepted only based on the way someone or something appears or seems, without being verified or investigated first. It's important that the current period of economic growth is not taken at face value by the government, as there is still a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done. The best salespeople are the ones who are taken at face value by their customers.
See also: face, taken, value

face value

The apparent or base value of something, assessed without further examination or consideration. Don't try to pick apart this movie for deeper meaning, just take it at face value. I made a mistake when I took my manipulative aunt's word at face value.
See also: face, value

at face value

1. Based on the way someone or something appears or seems, without being verified or investigated first. It's important that the current period of economic growth is not taken at face value by the government, as there is still a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done. You can't judge someone like Nicole at face value—she's actually much friendlier than she seems at first.
2. In exchange for the official price printed on a ticket (as opposed to a resale price determined by the seller). I'll even sell you the tickets at face value. Come on, that's a good deal! If we want to see The Rolling Stones, we need to get tickets at face value before they sell out—they'll be way too expensive once people start reselling them.
See also: face, value

at face value

from outward appearance; from what something first appears to be. (From the value printed on the "face" of a coin or bank note.) Don't just accept her offer at face value. Think of the implications. Joan tends to take people at face value and so she is always getting hurt.
See also: face, value

take someone or something at face value

to accept someone or something just as it appears; to believe that the way things appear is the way they really are. He means what he says. You have to take him at face value. I take everything he says at face value.
See also: face, take, value

take something at face value

to accept something exactly the way it appears to be. I don't know whether I can take her story at face value, but I will assume that she is not lying. The committee took the report at face value and approved the suggested changes.
See also: face, take, value

value someone or something above someone or something

to hold someone or something to be more important than someone or something. I value her above all things. He values his car above his family!
See also: above, value

value someone or something as something

to hold someone or something in esteem as something; to find someone or something to be as good as something. I value you as a close friend. I value this watch as a keepsake.
See also: value

value someone or something for something

to hold someone or something in esteem for a particular quality. I value him for his skill in negotiation. I value this car for its speed and dependability.
See also: value

value something at something

to consider something to be worth a certain amount. The museum curator valued the vase at one million dollars. I value this vase at one million dollars.
See also: value

take something at face value

to accept that something is exactly what it appears to be This is good research that can be taken at face value by readers. You have to understand that you cannot take gossip at its face value.
Etymology: based on the idea that the value (worth) of a piece of money is exactly the amount shown by a number on its face (front)
See also: face, take, value

take something at face value

to accept something because of the way it first looks or seems, without thinking about what else it could mean
Usage notes: The face value of a note or a coin is the number written on it.
(often negative) These results should not be taken at face value - careful analysis is required to assess their full implications.
See also: face, take, value

at face value, take

Accept from its outward appearance, as in You can't always take a manufacturer's advertisements at face value; they're bound to exaggerate . Literally this idiom has referred to the monetary value printed on a bank note, stock certificate, bond, or other financial instrument since the 1870s. The figurative usage is from the late 1800s.
See also: face, take
References in classic literature ?
The chief value of the new fact is to enhance the great and constant fact of Life, which can dwarf any and every circumstance, and to which the belt of wampum and the commerce of America are alike.
Each improvement makes the value of everything else pump up.
Either I must throw overboard all my old values of money and look upon it as something to be flung about wastefully, or I must throw overboard my comradeship with these men whose peculiar quirks made them like strong drink.
The author of "Zarathustra" never lost sight of that egregious example of a transvaluation of all values through Christianity, whereby the whole of the deified mode of life and thought of the Greeks, as well as strong Romedom, was almost annihilated or transvalued in a comparatively short time.
SOCRATES: Let us consider the matter together, and do you either refute me if you can, and I will be convinced; or else cease, my dear friend, from repeating to me that I ought to escape against the wishes of the Athenians: for I highly value your attempts to persuade me to do so, but I may not be persuaded against my own better judgment.
All that need be remarked on the power to coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, is, that by providing for this last case, the Constitution has supplied a material omission in the articles of Confederation.
Its intrinsic value does not exceed thirty thousand francs.
Astor, passed into the possession of the Northwest Company at about a third of their value.
Oolanga would have been startled had he known and been capable of understanding the real value placed on him, his beauty, his worthiness, by other persons, and compared it with the value in these matters in which he held himself.
For which reason the art of money-getting seems to be chiefly conversant about trade, and the business of it to be able to tell where the greatest profits can be made, being the means of procuring abundance of wealth and possessions: and thus wealth is very often supposed to consist in the quantity of money which any one possesses, as this is the medium by which all trade is conducted and a fortune made, others again regard it as of no value, as being of none by nature, but arbitrarily made so by compact; so that if those who use it should alter their sentiments, it would be worth nothing, as being of no service for any necessary purpose.
Denis Davydov, with his Russian instinct, was the first to recognize the value of this terrible cudgel which regardless of the rules of military science destroyed the French, and to him belongs the credit for taking the first step toward regularizing this method of warfare.
My one wish is that you will still let me love you and value you, as I might have loved and valued a brother.
We see the value set on animals even by the barbarians of Tierra del Fuego, by their killing and devouring their old women, in times of dearth, as of less value than their dogs.
These meditations were entirely employed on Mr Allworthy's fortune; for, first, he exercised much thought in calculating, as well as he could, the exact value of the whole: which calculations he often saw occasion to alter in his own favour: and, secondly and chiefly, he pleased himself with intended alterations in the house and gardens, and in projecting many other schemes, as well for the improvement of the estate as of the grandeur of the place: for this purpose he applied himself to the studies of architecture and gardening, and read over many books on both these subjects; for these sciences, indeed, employed his whole time, and formed his only amusement.
But you, who make a mock of human life, don't you place any value upon it whatever?