usual

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as per usual

As typically happens; as is usually the case. As per usual, my boyfriend didn't call me like he said he would. I'll be eating lunch outside on the picnic table, as per usual.
See also: per, usual

as usual

As is typical; as often happens. Sam is ignoring me, as usual. I wonder if he'll ever forgive me. The writers' group is meeting at the coffee shop on Saturday morning, as usual.
See also: usual

business as usual

The typical proceedings. The phrase is sometimes but not always used to indicate that things have returned to normal after something unforeseen or unpleasant has happened. Once these auditors are out of our hair, we can get back to business as usual. A: "How are things at the office?" B: "Business as usual. Nothing exciting has happened lately."
See also: business, usual

the usual suspects

The people one would expect to be involved in something. I expect misbehavior from the usual suspects, but even my quiet kids were acting up in class today. Let's have a game night! Call the usual suspects and I'll order pizza.
See also: suspect, usual

as usual

as is the normal or typical situation. John ordered eggs for breakfast, as usual. He stood quietly as usual, waiting for the bus to come.
See also: usual

business as usual

having things go along as usual. Even right after the flood, it was business as usual in all the stores. Please, everyone, business as usual. Let's get back to work.
See also: business, usual

as usual

In the normal, habitual, or accustomed way, as in As usual, he forgot to put away the milk. This idiom was first recorded in 1716. Also see business as usual.
See also: usual

business as usual

The normal course of some activity, as in The fire destroyed only a small section of the store, so it's business as usual. This term originated as an announcement that a commercial establishment was continuing to operate in spite of fire, construction, or some similar interruption. It had been extended to broader use by 1914, when Winston Churchill said in a speech: "The maxim of the British people is 'Business as usual,'" which became a slogan for the rest of World War I. Today it may be used in this positive sense and also pejoratively, as in Never mind that most civilians are starving to death-the ministry regards its job to be business as usual . [Late 1800s]
See also: business, usual

business as usual

You say business as usual to mean that everything is continuing in the normal way, even though something unpleasant or unexpected has happened. Asked if the President was trying to suggest it was business as usual, Mr Fitzwater replied: It is business as usual; this isn't the kind of crisis that requires us to drop everything else. If these guys are convicted, it could be the beginning of a real change. If they're not, it's business as usual.
See also: business, usual

it’s business as ˈusual

things continue normally, despite difficulties or disturbances: It was business as usual at the theatre yesterday, in spite of all the building work going on.
See also: business, usual

as per ˈusual/ˈnormal

(spoken) in the usual or normal manner: ‘What time is the lesson?’ ‘Thursday at 3 o’clock, as per usual.’‘Is he in a bad mood this morning?’ ‘Yes, as per normal.’
See also: normal, per, usual

as ˈusual

in the same way as what happens most of the time or in most cases: Steve, as usual, was the last to arrive.As usual at that hour, the place was deserted.Despite her problems, she carried on working as usual.
See also: usual

as usual

As commonly or habitually happens: As usual, I slept late that Saturday morning.
See also: usual
References in classic literature ?
The slight tinge that usually was seated on her cheek spreading over its whole surface like the faintest glow of sunset blending, by mellow degrees, with the surrounding clouds, was heightened to richness, and even diffused itself like a reflection, across her polished forehead, because she believed she was about to listen to a declaration that her years and her education united to tell her was never to approach female ears without slightly trespassing on the delicacy of her sex.
As to all the higher questions which determine the starting-point of a diagnosis--as to the philosophy of medial evidence--any glimmering of these can only come from a scientific culture of which country practitioners have usually no more notion than the man in the moon.
But he felt his neck under Bulstrode's yoke; and though he usually enjoyed kicking, he was anxious to refrain from that relief.
It is a very noticeable thing that, in fairy families, the youngest is always chief person, and usually becomes a prince or princess; and children remember this, and think it must be so among humans also, and that is why they are often made uneasy when they come upon their mother furtively putting new frills on the basinette.
Her fits of passion, which are awful to behold, and are usually called teething, are no such thing; they are her natural exasperation, because we don't understand her, though she is talking an intelligible language.
When dogs fight, there are usually preliminaries to the actual combat--snarlings and bristlings and stiff-legged struttings.
The sight of him was sufficient to start them rushing after him, at which times his swiftness usually carried him into safety.
In a few minutes the contents of that letter graced the expanse usually sacred to more prosaic compositions.
Nancy had been working in Miss Polly's kitchen only two months, but already she knew that her mistress did not usually hurry.
They are the data for more exact laws, and the grounds for believing that they are USUALLY true are stronger than the grounds for believing that the more exact laws are ALWAYS true.
Science starts, therefore, from generalizations of the form, "A is usually followed by B.
If the appearances from sufficiently neighbouring places are either wholly un changed, or changed to a diminishing extent which has zero for its limit, it is usually found that the changes can be accounted for by changes in objects which are between the object in question and the places from which its appearance has changed appreciably.
On reaching home Alexey Alexandrovitch went to his study, as he usually did, seated himself in his low chair, opened a book on the Papacy at the place where he had laid the paper-knife in it, and read till one o'clock, just as he usually did.
I am as cheerful, father, as I usually am, or usually have been.
It may not show up on medical tests, so the diagnosis is usually made on the basis of the physical exam.