usual


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

as per usual

As typically happens; as is usually the case. As per usual, my boyfriend didn't call me like he said he would. I'll be eating lunch outside on the picnic table, as per usual.
See also: per, usual

as usual

As is typical; as often happens. Sam is ignoring me, as usual. I wonder if he'll ever forgive me. The writers' group is meeting at the coffee shop on Saturday morning, as usual.
See also: usual

business as usual

The typical proceedings. The phrase is sometimes but not always used to indicate that things have returned to normal after something unforeseen or unpleasant has happened. Once these auditors are out of our hair, we can get back to business as usual. A: "How are things at the office?" B: "Business as usual. Nothing exciting has happened lately."
See also: business, usual

as usual

as is the normal or typical situation. John ordered eggs for breakfast, as usual. He stood quietly as usual, waiting for the bus to come.
See also: usual

business as usual

having things go along as usual. Even right after the flood, it was business as usual in all the stores. Please, everyone, business as usual. Let's get back to work.
See also: business, usual

business as usual

doing everything in the ordinary way Serious problems such as depression can make business as usual impossible for most people. She says we have to deal with the AIDS epidemic because business as usual is killing too many people.
See also: business, usual

as usual

in the ordinary or expected way As usual, she was wearing jeans. He was wrong about the time, as usual, and so we missed the first part of the concert.
See also: usual

business as usual

a situation that has returned to its usual state again after an unpleasant or surprising event It was business as usual at the school yesterday only a month after the fire.
See also: business, usual

the usual suspects

  (humorous)
the people you would expect to be present somewhere or doing a particular thing 'Who did you spend the evening with?' 'Oh, Dan, Yuko, Jayne - the usual suspects.'
See also: suspect, usual

as usual

In the normal, habitual, or accustomed way, as in As usual, he forgot to put away the milk. This idiom was first recorded in 1716. Also see business as usual.
See also: usual

business as usual

The normal course of some activity, as in The fire destroyed only a small section of the store, so it's business as usual. This term originated as an announcement that a commercial establishment was continuing to operate in spite of fire, construction, or some similar interruption. It had been extended to broader use by 1914, when Winston Churchill said in a speech: "The maxim of the British people is 'Business as usual,'" which became a slogan for the rest of World War I. Today it may be used in this positive sense and also pejoratively, as in Never mind that most civilians are starving to death-the ministry regards its job to be business as usual . [Late 1800s]
See also: business, usual

as usual

As commonly or habitually happens: As usual, I slept late that Saturday morning.
See also: usual
References in classic literature ?
This somewhat rallied up his spirit and warmed his heart; all the time of the operation, however, he kept his eyes riveted on the wound, with his teeth set, and a whimsical wincing of the countenance, that occasionally gave his nose something of its usual comic curl.
Toby as usual led the van, and in silence I waited to learn from him how he proposed to extricate us from this new difficulty.
He inhaled the sacred smoke, gave a puff upward to the heaven, then downward to the earth, then towards the east; after this it was as usual passed from mouth to mouth, each holding it respectfully until his neighbor had taken several whiffs; and now the grand council was considered as opened in due form.
Caswall summoned servants, who applied the usual remedies.
Squod, after waiting a little to ascertain if any further remark be expected of him, gets back by his usual series of movements to the target he has in hand and vigorously signifies through his former musical medium that he must and he will return to that ideal young lady.
After receiving this news late in the evening, when he was alone in his study, the old prince went for his walk as usual next morning, but he was silent with his steward, the gardener, and the architect, and though he looked very grim he said nothing to anyone.
She ran upstairs as usual, and was completely awakened to reality by the sight of Mrs.
She turned from side to side, in the hope that the coolness of the sheets would cure her, and that when she next opened her eyes to look the room would be as usual.
It was usual with him to season his pleasure in showing favor to one person by being especially disagreeable to another, and Mary was always at hand to furnish the condiment.
It might have pleased him, too, in some degree, to have seen how dull and dissatisfied she was throughout that week (the greater part of it, at least), for lack of her usual source of excitement; and how often she regretted having 'used him up so soon,' like a child that, having devoured its plumcake too hastily, sits sucking its fingers, and vainly lamenting its greediness.
He caught up with me on the road home, and grinned as cheerfully as usual.
Leaving a note for Arthur Barville, on his arrival in Venice, in which he merely mentioned that he had gone to look at the Italian lakes, and that a line addressed to his hotel at Milan would bring him back again, he took the afternoon train to Padua-- and dined with his usual appetite, and slept as well as ever that night.
When the morning dawned, the Cock, as usual, crowed very loudly several times.
But we may be certain that the talk being over she must have said to that young blackguard: "You had better take her out for a ride as usual.
Mr Allworthy, his sister, and another lady, were assembled at the accustomed hour in the supper-room, where, having waited a considerable time longer than usual, Mr Allworthy first declared he began to grow uneasy at the captain's stay (for he was always most punctual at his meals); and gave orders that the bell should be rung without the doors, and especially towards those walks which the captain was wont to use.