up to par


Also found in: Legal.

up to par

Fig. as good as the standard or average; up to standard. I'm just not feeling up to par today. I must be coming down with something. The manager said that the report was not up to par and gave it back to Mary to do over again.
See also: par, up

up to par

at the usual or expected standard up to the mark When your work is up to par we can review your salary again. Are your computer skills up to par?
Usage notes: often used in the form not up to par: She hasn't been up to par since the beginning of last week.
Related vocabulary: at (a) low ebb
See also: par, up

up to par

Also, up to scratch or snuff or speed or the mark . Satisfactory, up to a given standard, as in She didn't feel up to par today so she stayed home, or I'm sure he'll come up to scratch when the time comes, or She's up to snuff again. Nearly all the versions of this idiom come from sports, par from golf, scratch and mark from boxing (after being knocked down a fighter had eight seconds to make his way to a mark scratched in the center of the ring), and speed from racing. However, the allusion in the variant with snuff, which dates from the early 1800s, has been lost.
See also: par, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Then there are other career maintenance expenses: health club membership, photos, resumes, video reels, cassettes or CDs for voice-over artists, postage, assorted classes to keep skills up to par, and frequent visits with a hair colorist (no icky roots), dentist (bleaching or capping) and dermatologist (no zits allowed in close-ups).
Going beyond my initial expectations, they have upgraded our systems, helped us solve problems that we could not solve on our own, and made sure that our security and redundancy were up to par.
I've seen LSOs forced to give up their paddles due to piloting skills that were not up to par.
Although injuries are common in gymnastics, Kondos said Umeh's aches and pains are excessive and probably the result of early high-impact training and competing internationally, which means working with equipment that may not be up to par.