unknown to (one)

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unknown to (one)

With someone being unaware (of something). Unknown to Jacobson, the other two partners had drawn up the deal in such a way that they would have full control of the company in two years' time. My wife invited her entire family to come stay with us for Christmas—unknown to me.
See also: unknown

unknown to somebody

without the person mentioned being aware of it: Unknown to me, he had already signed the agreement.
See also: somebody, unknown
References in classic literature ?
Murray, of Horton Lodge, near O , about seventy miles from our village: a formidable distance to me, as I had never been above twenty miles from home in all the course of my twenty years' sojourn on earth; and as, moreover, every individual in that family and in the neighbourhood was utterly unknown to myself and all my acquaintances.
Although the stranger's name and rank were unknown to Rosalie's father, he was really the son of the King of the Golden Isle, which had for capital a city that extended from one sea to another.
The invisible Prince recognised these dead men as Kings of two large islands near his own home, but the names of the Princesses were unknown to him.
In social intercourse he gives you the surface that he wishes the world to accept, and you can only gain a true knowledge of him by inferences from little actions, of which he is unconscious, and from fleeting expressions, which cross his face unknown to him.
This letter" (as he spoke, Maximilian drew a letter from the purse and gave it to the count) -- "this letter was written by him the day that my father had taken a desperate resolution, and this diamond was given by the generous unknown to my sister as her dowry.
Different ratios of known to unknown items for drill tasks have been suggested including 70% to 85% known and 15% to 30% unknown (Gickling & Thompson, 1985), 10% unknown to 90% known (Tucker, 1989), 30% unknown to 70% known (Coulter & Coulter, 1990), and 50% unknown to 50% known (Neef; Iwata.
It was hypothesized that teaching students new words at a ratio of 17% unknown to 83% known, which fell within Gickling's suggested 70% to 85% known ratio, would lead to the largest number of retained items and would also lead to the highest percentage of on-task behaviors.
Cost: No one can tell how much the remediation will cost - and very few corporate executives are willing to commit to an unknown to their CEO or Board of Directors.