union


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Related to union: European Union, Soviet Union

fruit of the union

1. A child or children resulting from the union between two people, such as a marriage or domestic union. Also written as "fruit of one's union." Why wouldn't you want to have children? They're the normal fruit of the union of marriage! When we started the divorce proceedings, the largest question was who would retain custody over the fruit of our union.
2. The offspring resulting from a sexual union between two mates. A "labradoodle," one of the cutest but silliest-named crossbreeds around, is the fruit of the union between a Labrador Retriever and a poodle.
3. The outcome, result, or product of an interaction or union between two or more bodies, elements, or forces. Water is merely the fruit of the union of two hydrogen atoms and a single oxygen atom. The treaty was ultimately the fruit of the union of two brilliant academics on either side of the war, who worked for months with each side's leaders to find a peaceful solution to the conflict.
See also: fruit, of, union

Union is strength.

Prov. If people join together, they are more powerful than if they work by themselves. The students decided to join together in order to present their grievances to the faculty, since union is strength. We cannot allow our opponents to divide us. Union is strength.
See also: strength, union
References in classic literature ?
Two others oped their iron jaws, And waved their children-stealing paws; There sat their children in gewgaws; By stinting negroes' backs and maws, They kept up heavenly union.
All good from Jack another takes, And entertains their flirts and rakes, Who dress as sleek as glossy snakes, And cram their mouths with sweetened cakes; And this goes down for union.
The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
The measures of the Union have not been executed; the delinquencies of the States have, step by step, matured themselves to an extreme, which has, at length, arrested all the wheels of the national government, and brought them to an awful stand.
The Western Union had lost its case, for several very simple reasons: It had tried to operate a telephone system on telegraphic lines, a plan that has invariably been unsuccessful, it had a low idea of the possibilities of the telephone business; and its already busy agents had little time or knowledge or enthusiasm to give to the new enterprise.
Every one knew that the Bell people had whipped the West- ern Union, and hastened to join in the grand Te Deum of applause.
But, as may be imagined, when the news of the Western Union agreement became known, the story of the telephone became a fairy tale of success.
The main object of these companies was not, like that of the Western Union, to do a legitimate telephone business, but to sell stock to the public.
Whether or not the "settlement" was simply a trick of the packers to gain time, or whether they really expected to break the strike and cripple the unions by the plan, cannot be said; but that night there went out from the office of Durham and Company a telegram to all the big packing centers, "Employ no union leaders.
There was no one to picture the battle the union leaders were fighting--to hold this huge army in rank, to keep it from straggling and pillaging, to cheer and encourage and guide a hundred thousand people, of a dozen different tongues, through six long weeks of hunger and disappointment and despair.
Some of them were experienced workers,--butchers, salesmen, and managers from the packers' branch stores, and a few union men who had deserted from other cities; but the vast majority were "green" Negroes from the cotton districts of the far South, and they were herded into the packing plants like sheep.
To which the superintendent replied that he might safely trust Durham's for that--they proposed to teach these unions a lesson, and most of all those foremen who had gone back on them.
And the same with all the other unions outside the combination.
It simply prolongs the fight, this treachery of the big unions.
But with such a powerful combination as the Oligarchy and the big unions, is there any reason to believe that the Revolution will ever triumph?