uncle

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cry uncle

To admit defeat and/or plead for mercy, especially in an informal physical contest of some kind. The brothers often play fought, but it was invariably the younger of the two who had to cry uncle by the end.
See also: cry, uncle

Uncle!

An exclamation of defeat and/or a plea for mercy, especially in an informal physical contest of some kind. Uncle! Uncle! Let me out of this headlock already!

everybody and his uncle

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his uncle is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, uncle

everyone and his uncle

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everyone and his uncle is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everyone, uncle

an Uncle Tom

A derisive term for a black person who is submissive or servile to white people. The phrase refers to the titular faithful black servant in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin. He was once a passionate activist, but he's become an Uncle Tom.
See also: tom, uncle

Bob's your uncle

A phrase used to emphasize how easily or quickly something can be done. All you have to do is combine all of the ingredients in one pot, let it cook, and then Bob's your uncle, dinner is ready!
See also: uncle

say uncle

To admit defeat and/or plead for mercy, especially in an informal physical contest of some kind. Can also be used as an imperative phrase to demand that someone give up or admit defeat. The brothers often play fought, but it was invariably the younger of the two who had to say uncle by the end. Say "uncle," and I'll let you out of this headlock!
See also: say, uncle

Dutch uncle

One who addresses someone severely or critically. Fred is always lecturing me like a Dutch uncle, forgetting the fact that I'm 40 years old!
See also: Dutch, uncle

everybody and his brother

A lot of people. Geez, everybody and his brother was riding the subway with me this morning—I could barely push through the crowd at my stop!
See also: and, brother, everybody

(well) I'll be a monkey's uncle

A clichéd expression of surprise or amazement. Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle—Shane actually managed to get his movie made.
See also: uncle

Uncle Sam

The US government. The image of "Uncle Sam" is known for appearing on US army recruitment posters. It seems like Uncle Sam is always taking more and more taxes out of our paychecks.
See also: SAM, uncle

Dutch uncle

a man who gives frank and direct advice to someone. (In the way an uncle might, but not a real relative.) I would not have to lecture you like a Dutch uncle if you were not so extravagant. He acts more like a Dutch uncle than a husband. He's forever telling her what to do in public.
See also: Dutch, uncle

everybody and his brother

 and everybody and his uncle
Fig. everybody; lots of people. The state fair was packed. Everybody and his brother was there. Everybody and his uncle was asking me where you was today.
See also: and, brother, everybody

holler uncle

 and cry uncle; say uncle
Fig. to admit defeat. Joe kept pounding on Jim, trying to get him to holler uncle. He twisted my arm until I cried uncle.
See also: holler, uncle

I'll be a monkey's uncle!

Fig. I am amazed! A: I just won $500,000 in the lottery! B: Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle!

talk to someone

 
1. Lit. to speak to someone; to confer with someone. Talk to me! I really want your opinion. I will have to talk to Mark to see what he thinks.
2. Fig. to lecture to someone; to reprimand someone. I wish you would talk to your son. He is creating havoc in the classroom. I am going to have to talk to Roberta. She is not getting things clean.
See also: talk

cry uncle

Also, say uncle. Concede defeat, as in The Serbs want the Bosnians to cry uncle, or If you say uncle right now, I'll let you go first in the next game. This phrase originated about 1900 as an imperative among school-children who would say, "Cry uncle when you've had enough (of a beating)." By the mid-1900s it was being used figuratively, as in the examples.
See also: cry, uncle

Dutch uncle

A stern, candid critic or adviser, as in When I got in trouble with the teacher again, the principal talked to me like a Dutch uncle . This expression, often put as talk to one like a Dutch uncle, presumably alludes to the sternness and sobriety attributed to the Dutch. [Early 1800s]
See also: Dutch, uncle

talk to

Also, give a talking to. Scold, reprimand, as in The teacher said he'd have to talk to Jeff after school, or Dad gave us both a good talking to. [Colloquial; second half of 1800s] For talk to like a Dutch uncle, see Dutch uncle.
See also: talk

Bob's your uncle

BRITISH
You can say Bob's your uncle to show that something is easy and quick to achieve. You just tag along with a teacher for a while, and in a year, Bob's your uncle, you are a teacher too. If the boiler ever gets too hot, the safety valve releases all the excess steam, and Bob's your uncle. No problem. Note: This expression dates back to a political scandal in Britain in 1886. The Prime Minister Robert Cecil gave his nephew the position of Chief Secretary for Ireland, and many people criticized him for this. The name `Bob' is short for `Robert'.
See also: uncle

Mr. Whiskers

and Uncle Whiskers and whiskers (man)
n. a federal agent. (Underworld. From the whiskers of Uncle Sam.) Mr. Whiskers is trying to get me to pay tax on those few bucks. If Uncle Whiskers finds out what you’re doing, you’re done for.
See also: Whisker

Uncle Whiskers

verb
See also: uncle, Whisker

say uncle

tv. to admit defeat; to give up. I never say uncle. I just keep right on going.
See also: say, uncle

Uncle nab

n. a policeman. Watch out for Uncle nab. He’s been asking about you.
See also: nab, uncle

Uncle (Sam)

and Uncle Sugar
1. n. the personification of the U.S. Uncle Sugar wants a little more of your money this year.
2. n. a federal agent; federal agents. Uncle has some pretty strong ideas about who’s in charge of this investigation.
See also: SAM, uncle

Uncle Sugar

verb
See also: sugar, uncle

Uncle

verb

monkey's uncle

An impossibility. Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, especially the notion that man was descended from apes, was greeted with much skepticism, and especially in parts of the English-speaking world where Creationism held sway. Hence the expression “Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle,” which was used to show grave doubts about any and all seemingly improbable situations. Another animal phrase used by doubters and scorners was “when pigs fly.”
See also: uncle