tying


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Related to tying: typing

tie on the (old) feed bag

slang To begin eating; to have a meal. I can't wait to get to grandma's and tie on the old feed bag. She always cooks the tastiest food! What do you say we tie on the feed bag before we head out?
See also: bag, feed, on, tie

tie (oneself) in(to) knots

1. To make oneself confused, anxious, worried, and/or upset, as when trying to make a decision, come up with an idea, or resolve an issue. Now don't go tying yourself into knots over the details of your papers—at this point, all you need is a cohesive outline. We've tied ourselves in knots this past week trying to choose who to hire, but I think we've reached a decision.
2. To befuddle oneself while attempting to explain something (to someone). Primarily heard in UK. Jim's a smart guy, but for some reason, he always ties himself into knots whenever I ask him to explain something on the computer for me.
See also: knot, tie

tie (someone) in(to) knots

To make someone confused, anxious, worried, and/or upset. I've been planning on proposing to James on Sunday, but the nervousness is tying me into knots! It's something about the austere way the boss talks that always ties you into knots.
See also: knot, tie

tie up (some/a few) loose ends

To take care of, finish, or resolve some issues or pieces of business that are not critical but have remained outstanding. I'm just about ready to move to Europe, but I need to tie up some loose ends with my ex-girlfriend before I go. The legal team is still tying up a few loose ends in the merger contract, but, other than that, we are ready to move ahead with the deal.
See also: end, loose, tie, up

tie (oneself) (up) in knots

1. To make oneself confused, anxious, worried, and/or upset, as when trying to make a decision, come up with an idea, or resolve an issue. Now don't go tying yourself in knots over the details of your papers — at this point, all you need is a cohesive outline. We've tied ourselves in up knots this past week trying to decide on who to hire, but I think we've reached a decision.
2. To become flustered while attempting to explain something (to someone). Jim's a smart guy, but for some reason he always ties himself up in knots whenever I ask him to explain something on the computer for me.
See also: knot, tie

tie (one) (up) in knots

To make one confused, anxious, worried, and/or upset. I've been planning to propose to James on Sunday, but the nervousness is tying me in knots! It's something about the austere, imposing way the boss speaks that always ties everyone up in knots.
See also: knot, tie

tie (one) down

To constrain, restrict, impede, or limit one's ability to do something or go somewhere. I would love to try something different, but because our rent is so high, I'm tied down to my current job. Once you're tied down with kids, travel anywhere becomes extremely difficult. The company is trying to tie us down with appeals and injunctions to keep the lawsuit from reaching a court.
See also: down, tie

tie in

To have or create a close association with or connection to something; to complement or closely relate to something. This ties in to the earlier theory that social interactions are actually an evolutionary development. The film uses very particular colors to tie in with the themes of grief and despondency.
See also: tie

tie the knot

To marry (someone). All of my friends have tied the knot and started having kids. John and Mary are tying the knot this summer in France.
See also: knot, tie

tie up

1. To bind, fasten, or secure something with or as with string, cords, rope, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tie" and "up." Make sure you tie up the boats at the dock so they don't get swept down the river. Will you tie these bundles of paper up for me, please?
2. To keep someone busy, occupied, or engaged. In this usage, a name, noun, or pronoun can be used between "tie" and "up." The meeting tied us up for most of the afternoon. I just have a couple of questions, so I won't tie you up for too long.
3. To block, impede, or delay something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tie" and "up." The construction has been tying up traffic on Main Street for nearly a year now. They've tied our application up in court, so we haven't made any real progress lately.
4. To commit something to a prior use, thus making it unavailable for anything else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tie" and "up." I wish I hadn't tied our savings up in that bogus real estate scheme. We've tied up too many of our resources in this project already.
5. In a competition or contest, to achieve a score equal to one's opponent. That amazing touch down has tied the game up as we go into half time. One more correct answer and you'll be able to tie things up.
See also: tie, up

tie (one's) hands

To prevent one from behaving or acting in a certain way. I really wish I could help you get a refund, but the company's strict returns policy has tied my hands. If the government would stop tying our hands with these burdensome regulations, our economy would actually have a chance to flourish for once!
See also: hand, tie

tie in

(with someone or something) to join with someone or something; to connect with someone or something. (See also tie in with something.) I would like to tie in with you and see if we can solve this together. We would like for you to tie in and share your expertise.
See also: tie

tie in (to something)

to fasten or connect to something. Can you fix it so my computer can tie into Rachel's? This one will not tie into her computer.
See also: tie

tie someone or something up

 
1. Lit. to bind someone or something securely. The sheriff tied the crooks up and took them to a cell. He tied up the bandit. I tied the package up and put a label on it.
2. Fig. to keep someone or something busy or occupied. Sally tied up the photocopy machine all afternoon. The meeting tied me up all afternoon.
See also: tie, up

tie something up

 
1. Lit. to tie strings or cords on something in order to close or contain it. Please tie this package up securely so I can mail it. Tie up your shoes!
2. Fig. to conclude and finalize something. (See also tie someone or something up.) Let's try to tie up this deal by Thursday. We'll manage to tie our business up by Wednesday at the latest.
3. Fig. to block or impede something, such as traffic or progress. The stalled bus tied traffic up for over an hour. The stalled bus tied up traffic.
See also: tie, up

tie the knot

 
1. Fig. to marry a mate. We tied the knot in a little chapel on the Arkansas border. They finally tied the knot.
2. Fig. [for a cleric or other authorized person] to unite a couple in marriage. It was hard to find somebody to tie the knot at that hour. It only took a few minutes for the ship's captain to tie the knot.
See also: knot, tie

tie up (some place)

[for a skipper] to moor a ship or boat some place. We need to tie up some place for the night. The captain tied up at the dock and sent the first mate for fuel.
See also: tie, up

tie in

Connect closely with, coordinate, as in They are trying to tie in the movie promotion with the book it is based on, or His story does not tie in with the facts. [First half of 1900s]
See also: tie

tie the knot

Get married; also, perform a marriage ceremony. For example, So when are you two going to tie the knot? or They asked their friend, who is a judge, to tie the knot. [Early 1700s]
See also: knot, tie

tie up

1. Fasten securely; also, moor a ship. For example, Can you help me tie up these bundles? or The forecast was terrible, so we decided to tie up at the dock and wait out the storm. The first usage dates from the early 1500s, the nautical usage from the mid-1800s.
2. Impede the progress of, block, as in The accident tied up traffic for hours. [Late 1500s]
3. Keep occupied, engage, as in She was tied up in a meeting all morning. [Late 1800s]
4. Make funds or property inaccessible for other uses, as in Her cash is tied up in government bonds. [Early 1800s]
See also: tie, up

tie the knot

INFORMAL
COMMON If two people tie the knot, they get married. The couple tied the knot last year after a 13-year romance. Len tied the knot with Kate five years ago. Note: Tying knots in items of clothing or ribbons worn by the bride and groom is a traditional feature of many wedding ceremonies, symbolizing their unity.
See also: knot, tie

tie the knot

get married. informal
See also: knot, tie

tie the ˈknot

(informal) get married: When did you two decide to tie the knot?
See also: knot, tie

tie in

v.
1. To bring something into a close or effective relation with something: The college tied its fundraising campaign in with the alumni reunion. The pattern on the carpet ties in all the different fabrics in the room. In this paragraph, the author reviews the main points and ties them in.
2. To have a close or effective relation with something: The music should tie in with the holiday theme. If you make a remark during the lecture, the professor will discuss it as long as it ties in.
See also: tie

tie up

v.
1. To fasten, secure, or bind someone or something with or as if with a cord, rope, or strap: I tied up the package with twine and sent it off. The robbers tied the bank tellers up and locked them in the vault.
2. To secure something, such as a vessel, to a shore or pier; dock something: Did you remember to tie the boat up? I tied the canoe up at the end of the dock. The captain pulled the ship alongside the pier, and the crew tied up.
3. To be secured to a shore or pier; dock: The ship tied up at the end of the pier.
4. To keep someone or something occupied; engage someone or something: The kids have tied up the phone all evening, talking to their friends. A project this large will tie our resources up for months. The senator is tied up in a meeting and won't be able to take your call.
5. To place some funds so as to make them inaccessible for other uses: Don't tie up all your cash in long-term investments. The bank has tied the money up in bad loans.
6. To equal an opponent's score in some contest: We tied up the game with minutes remaining. A touchdown will tie the game up. The game is all tied up at 10 points apiece.
See also: tie, up

tie the knot

1. tv. to marry a mate. We tied the knot in a little chapel on the Arkansas border.
2. tv. [for a cleric] to unite a couple in marriage. It was hard to find somebody to tie the knot at that hour.
See also: knot, tie

tie the knot

Slang
1. To get married.
2. To perform a marriage ceremony.
See also: knot, tie
References in periodicals archive ?
Erik Eenkema van Dijk, whose company markets extrusion balers made in the Netherlands by Bollegraaf, notes another advantage of this tying method.
Making bales that are welcome at mills is the ultimate goal for shippers, adding yet one more consideration for recyclers who are shopping for a new baler and its accompanying wire tying system.
Part II introduces the discussion of tying conspiracies.
Part III shows how current antitrust doctrine fails to appreciate the anticompetitive risks inherent in tying conspiracies.
Part IV advocates that courts treat tying conspiracies as per se illegal.
Finally, Part V lays out the elements that should be necessary to prove a tying conspiracy cause of action under section 1 of the Sherman Act.
Though Congress enacted the Sherman Act in 1890, the origins of Sherman Act tying law lie in the Clayton Act of 1914.
These awkward origins of the section 1 tying claim may help explain why tying jurisprudence developed along a separate path from other section 1 causes of action.
The language of section 3 of the Clayton Act describes a tie-in in which one firm imposes a tying requirement on its customers.
It makes it illegal for one firm to unilaterally impose a tying requirement.
After the Supreme Court brought tying arrangements within the ambit of section 1 of the Sherman Act, federal courts nevertheless continued to treat tying arrangements as a unilateral phenomenon.
Focusing on unilateral tie-ins, federal courts have long condemned tying arrangements as anticompetitive.
With the goal of preventing monopolists from leveraging monopoly power across product markets, tying jurisprudence eventually arrived at a basic four-prong test for determining whether a tying arrangement is per se illegal.
Because this test for tie-ins evolved to address unilaterally imposed tying arrangements, it does not specifically address the problem of concerted tying arrangements.
THE INHERENT ANTICOMPETITIVE DANGER OF TYING CONSPIRACIES