twist in the wind

twist(slowly) in the wind

Fig. to suffer the agony of some humiliation or punishment. (Alludes to an execution by hanging.) I'll seeyou twist in the wind for trying to frustrate this investigation. The prosecutor was determined that Richard would twist slowly in the wind for the crime.
See also: twist, wind

(leave somebody to) twist in the wind

1. to keep someone waiting for a decision or answer leave somebody hanging Carolyn was left twisting in the wind for about a week, and so were several other people who interviewed for the job.
2. to be forced to exist without support or help Some workers were fired and left to twist in the wind after many years on the job. People know she's ambitious and are afraid she might leave the company twisting in the wind if a better job came along.
See also: twist, wind

twist in the wind

Be abandoned to a bad situation, especially be left to incur blame, as in The governor denied knowing it was illegal and left his aide to twist in the wind. It is also put as leave twisting in the wind, meaning "abandon or strand in a difficult situation," as in Sensing a public relations disaster, the President left the Vice-President twisting in the wind . This expression, at first applied to a President's nominees who faced opposition and were abandoned by the President, alludes to the corpse of a hanged man left dangling and twisting in the open air. [Slang; early 1970s] Also see out on a limb.
See also: twist, wind

twist in the wind

verb
See also: twist, wind
References in periodicals archive ?
4--Don Ohlmeyer's reputation: Can he protect Miller from the NFL establishment or will he let Miller twist in the wind like golf's Gary McCord after the first big complaint from the league higher-ups?