turn (one) away from (someone or something)

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turn (one) away from (someone or something)

To cause one to abandon, quit, disown, or be repelled or repulsed by someone or something. The ugliness of the last election turned many people away from politics for good. Extremely high prices have been turning would-be homeowners away from buying property in the area.
See also: away, turn

turn away from (someone or something)

1. Literally, to turn one's body, head, or eyes in a different direction than someone or something, typically to avoid facing or looking at them. I turned away from the couple as they started fighting in front of me. Don't turn away from me—look me in the eye!
2. To abandon, quit, or disown someone or something. I know that many people are turning away from the traditional political parties because they feel like they aren't adequately represented by either. I turned away from the police force due to the corruption I encountered every day.
See also: away, turn
References in classic literature ?
Once more Hamel descended from the little train, and, turning away from St.
A carriage which appeared to have been standing there, was just turning away from the sidewalk.
London, Sept 16 (ANI): Singer Lily Allen has revealed that she is taking a big risk in turning away from her pop career to concentrate on motherhood.
I'm turning away from something successful and focusing on Sam, my baby and my business.
There's no evidence that the Taliban is turning away from violence," he said.
Yet, as Noll points out, this isn't voters simply turning away from taxes.
While the White House strongly supports heavy subsidies to expand coal burning, other industrial nations, including Canada, are turning away from this climate-disruptive fuel.
To choose Christ means changing your life, turning away from sin, turning away from whatever comforting vice or vices are your habit.
Religious mandates to care for strangers and the least privileged in the community are obviously behind this receptivity, but it is also born from a recognition that the demographics of the region are changing and, hence, institutional survival is connected to inclusivity and decline is likely to be the price of turning away from the newcomers.
A basketball player at a tiny college north of New York City is conducting a one-woman political demonstration this season by turning away from the flag during pregame performances of the national anthem.