turn over


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Related to turn over: turn over a new leaf, Turn over number

turn someone or something over

to rotate someone or something so that the side that was on the bottom is now on the top. The nurses turned the patient over so they could give her some medicine. They turned over the unconscious patient.
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turn over

 
1. Lit. to rotate so that the side that was on the bottom is now on top. The turtle turned over and crawled away. She turned over to get some sun on her back.
2. and kick over Fig. [for an engine] to start or to rotate. My car engine was so cold that it wouldn't even turn over. The engine kicked over a few times and then stopped for good.
3. Fig. to undergo exchange; to be replaced. The employees turn over pretty regularly in this department.
See also: over, turn

turn over

1. Invert, bring the bottom to the top, as in We have to turn over the soil before we plant anything. [Second half of 1300s]
2. Shift position, as by rolling from side to side. For example, This bed is so narrow I can barely turn over. [First half of 1700s]
3. Rotate, cycle, as in The engine turned over but the car wouldn't start. [Early 1900s]
4. Think about, consider, as in She turned over the idea in her mind. [Early 1800s]
5. Transfer to another, surrender, as in I turned over the funds to the children. [Mid-1500s]
6. Do business to the extent or amount of, as in We hoped the company would turn over a million dollars the first year. [Mid-1800s]
7. Seem to lurch or heave convulsively, as in The plane hit an air pocket and my stomach turned over. [Second half of 1800s]
8. Replace or renew the constituent parts, as in Half of our staff turns over every few years. [Mid-1900s] Also see turn over a new leaf.
See also: over, turn

turn over

v.
1. To bring the bottom of something to the top or vice versa; invert something: The farmer turned over the soil with a plow. The angry mob attacked the police car and turned it over.
2. To shift the position of, as by rolling from one side to the other: I turned over the box to read the instructions on the back. You have to turn the page over to read the rest of the story.
3. To shift one's position by rolling from one side to the other: The puppy turned over and lay on its back.
4. To rotate; cycle: The engine turned over but wouldn't start.
5. To think about something; consider something: I spent all night turning over what you said yesterday. She turned the problem over in her mind.
6. To transfer possession or control of someone or something to another; surrender someone or something: The CEO turned over the company to her son when she retired. If you find any evidence connected to a crime, you should turn it over to the authorities.
7. Sports To lose possession of something, such as a ball: Our quarterback turned over the ball five times in one game. The visiting team turned the ball over on their first play.
8. To do business to the extent or amount of something: The company turns over $1 million each year.
9. To seem to lurch or heave convulsively: My stomach turned over when the roller coaster started moving.
10. To search someplace thoroughly: The police turned over the house looking for evidence. The burglars had turned the place over but couldn't find the jewels they were looking for.
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turn over

verb
See also: over, turn

turn over

1. in. to get off of drugs. (Like turn over a new leaf.) There is a clinic on Maple Street that’ll help heads turn over.
2. Go to turn around.
See also: over, turn