turn one's head

turn (one's) head

1. To avoid paying attention to something uncomfortable, undesirable, unsafe, or inconvenient. We all knew that what the board of directors was doing was wrong, but we all just turned our heads because we were still profiting from it. Everyone turned their heads when we raised concerns years ago, and look at what happened as a result!
2. To cause someone to suddenly become fixated or infatuated. She spent all summer exercising and changing her eating habits, and she turned everyone's heads when she came back to school that fall.
3. To cause someone to become arrogant, conceited, or self-important. He's a pretty mediocre writer, but getting published in that literary journal seems to have turned his head.
See also: head, turn

turn one's head

1. Cause to become infatuated, as in The new teacher turned all the girls' heads. [Mid-1800s]
2. Cause to become conceited, as in Winning that prize has turned his head. A 16th-century translator of Seneca used this phrase: "His head was turned by too great success" ( Ad Lucullus, 1571).
See also: head, turn
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be far easier to simply nod and turn one's head.
Background such as glass walls and having to turn one's head and body increase the difficulty in picking up the ball and staying focused on it.
Simply to turn one's head and walk away without tipping over requires the coordination of what one sees, hears, and feels, at the very least, he asserts.
The willingness to turn one's head at moral outrage will only pave the way to even greater problems.
Thus "even to learn to turn one's head towards a sound .
One of the joys of being a physicist is that one can turn one's head from the evil to contemplate a pattern that seems at first terribly abstract, but in the end may be more real than predation or cancer or nuclear war.