turn of the tide


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turn of the tide

A reversal of fortune, as in This last poll marked the turn of the tide, with our candidate gaining a sizable majority. Similarly, to turn the tide means "reverse a situation," as in The arrival of reinforcements turned the tide in the battle. This idiom transfers the ebb and flow of the ocean's tides to human affairs. Although the idea is much older, the precise idiom dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: of, tide, turn
References in periodicals archive ?
Turn of the Tide by Margaret Skea is available now in paperback at www.
If you have not yet taken out one of those tempting fixed-rate mortgages to lock yourself in to the cheapest money for a generation, you may have missed the turn of the tide.
The consolidation and the emergence of the new Green Federation in the coming months may well mean a very positive turn of the tide.
The biggest mover is Vail Resorts (NYSE: MTN) rising from #75 to #12 in 2009, possibly indicating a turn of the tide in consumer spending.
The weather was fine with a light wind that eased at the turn of the tide.
The dolphins were just waiting for the turn of the tide before moving in to snap up the salmon.
This apparent turn of the tide helps to justify last week quarter-point interest rates cut by the Bank of England's monetary policy committee, which reduced the official cost of borrowing to 3.
But hopefully the National Assembly's decision to provide up to pounds 3m to preserve the ship recently unearthed in Newport signals the turn of the tide.