tumble


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take a tumble

1. To fall suddenly to the ground, typically from stumbling or tripping. I took a bit of a tumble walking home last night, hence the bruises.
2. To suffer a sudden fall or decline, as of profits, health, quality, etc. The price of shares in the tech giant took a tumble on Tuesday after it emerged that they had been manipulating sales figures over the last five years. My father has been doing remarkably well in his battle with cancer, but he has taken a tumble in the last few days.
See also: take, tumble

rough and tumble

Rowdy, disorderly, and boisterous; marked by scuffles or infighting. An allusion to a boxing match in which there are no rules. Sometimes hyphenated when used before a noun. The kids started getting a bit too rough and tumble when their cousin Jake came over. It's healthy for them to have a bit of rough-and-tumble play, so long as they make time for quiet play, as well.
See also: and, rough, tumble

the rough and tumble of (something)

The disorder, aggressive infighting, arguing, or competitiveness of something. An allusion to a boxing match in which there are no rules. I just wanted to make a difference to the people who lived in my community. I wasn't prepared for the rough and tumble of local politics.
See also: and, of, rough, tumble

tumble down

1. To collapse or come falling downward. He tripped on the wire running across the hallway and went tumbling down the stairs. The tower came tumbling down after the demolition crews set off the explosive charges.
2. To fall from a high rank or a position of power. That surprise loss sees the former champion tumble down from 1st to 6th place in the tournament leaderboards. The scandal brought the prime minister tumbling down from power. Stock prices have continued tumbling down as the president refuses to rule out a trade war with other nations.
See also: down, tumble

tumble across (something)

1. Literally, to trip on something with one's foot. I wasn't watching where I was going and tumbled across the root of a tree. The child tumbled across the steps of the house.
2. To find, discover, or happen upon something casually or by chance. I tumbled across this fantastic little café the other day. Let me know if you tumble across my keys—I haven't been able to find them.
See also: across, tumble

tumble upon (something)

1. Literally, to trip on something with one's foot. I wasn't watching where I was going and tumbled upon the root of a tree. The child tumbled upon the steps of the house.
2. To find, discover, or happen upon something casually or by chance. I tumbled upon this fantastic little café the other day. Let me know if you tumble upon my keys—I haven't been able to find them.
See also: tumble, upon

tumble on (something)

1. Literally, to trip on something with one's foot. I wasn't watching where I was going and tumbled on the root of a tree. The child tumbled on the steps of the house.
2. To find, discover, or happen upon something casually or by chance. I tumbled on this fantastic little café the other day. Let me know if you tumble on my keys—I haven't been able to find them.
See also: on, tumble

tumble to (something)

1. To fall or topple to some lower location or level. I feared the worst when I saw my grandfather tumble to the floor. He kicked the crate and watched it tumble to the basement.
2. obsolescent To arrive at some conclusion or understanding. I have since tumbled to the belief that animals prove far better companions than other people. It was only after the debt collectors began taking away our belongings that I tumbled to the reality of David's financial woes.
See also: tumble

rough-and-tumble

 and rough-and-ready
disorderly; aggressive. That was a rough-and-tumble football game. George is too rough-and-ready for me. He doesn't know how to act around civilized people.

tumble along

to roll or bounce along. The ball tumbled along, across the lawn and into the street. As the boulder tumbled along, it crushed everything in its path.
See also: tumble

tumble down

to fall down; to topple. The old barn was so rickety that it almost tumbled down on its own. The pile of books tumbled down all over the floor.
See also: down, tumble

tumble from something

to fall from something. The food tumbled from the tray and fell to the floor. The books tumbled from the shelf during the earthquake.
See also: tumble

tumble into bed

to get into or fall into bed. Liz went home and tumbled into bed.
See also: bed, tumble

tumble into someone or something

to fall down and roll into someone or something. (Either accidentally or on purpose.) Liz tripped and tumbled into the table. She tumbled into Ken.
See also: tumble

tumble out of something

to fall, topple, or drop out of something. Don't let the baby tumble out of the chair! Thechildren tumbled out of the car and ran for the school building.
See also: of, out, tumble

tumble over

to fall over. The vase tumbled over and broke. I held Timmy up to keep him from tumbling over.
See also: over, tumble

tumble over someone or something

to trip or stumble over someone or something and fall down. I tumbled over Fred, who was napping under the tree. I tumbled over a chair and fell down.
See also: over, tumble

tumble over (something)

to fall over the edge of something. Stay away from the edge. I don't want any of you tumbling over it. Don't go too close. You'll tumble over.
See also: over, tumble

tumble someone or something down something

to tip or push someone or something down something. Timmy tumbled his brother down the hill. Ann tumbled her laundry down the chute.
See also: down, tumble

rough and tumble

Disorderly scuffling or infighting, as in She had some reservations about entering the rough and tumble of local politics. This expression originated in the late 1700s in boxing, where it referred to a fight without rules. [Mid-1800s]
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and tumble

COMMON You use rough and tumble to mean a situation in which there is a lot of arguing or competition and people do not worry about upsetting or harming others. Whoever expected leaders in the rough and tumble of electoral politics to be nice or fair? Note: You can use rough-and-tumble before a noun. He started his political career in the rough-and-tumble world of student politics. Note: You usually use this expression when you think that this is normal or acceptable behaviour. Note: Originally, a rough and tumble was a boxing match in which there were no rules or restrictions.
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and tumble

a situation without rules or organization; a free-for-all.
The expression originated in 19th-century boxing slang.
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and ˈtumble


1 a situation in which people compete with each other and are aggressive in order to get what they want: In the rough and tumble of politics you can’t trust anyone.
2 a noisy but not serious fight: The toddlers often join in the rough and tumble of the older children’s games.
See also: and, rough, tumble

tumble down

v.
1. To topple, as from power or a high position; fall: That horse started out the race in the lead, but tumbled down to fifth place.
2. To collapse: The wall tumbled down when I leaned on it.
See also: down, tumble

tumble on

or tumble upon
v.
To come upon something accidentally; happen on something: We tumbled on a nice restaurant while walking downtown.
See also: on, tumble

tumble to

v. Slang
To come to some sudden understanding; catch on to something: I tumbled to the reality that the other card players were cheating.
See also: tumble

rough and tumble

mod. disorderly; aggressive. George is too rough and tumble for me. He doesn’t know how to act around civilized people.
See also: and, rough, tumble
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Jenkinson said: "The majority of indicators indicate the most likely cause was in the vicinity of the tumble dryer, however I could not categorically rule out the possibility of the iron.
It is the authors' experience that the enhanced large-scale motion inside the chamber can promote air/fuel mixing, but careful attention should be paid to the fuel injector spray targeting: a higher tumble level might give rise to an increase in fuel wall wetting.
He now needs to show that the likely cause of the fire was a fault with the tumble dryer and not his own misuse of the appliance.
Mishell was aware of a problem with the tumble dryer before the fire because she turned the machine off.
She added: "Mishell was aware of a problem with the tumble dryer before the fire because she turned the machine off.
I went upstairs to get my keys and I tried to get the tumble dryer out the back door but I couldn't get past the flames.
Moreno Francioso, community fire safety and arson manager, said: "This incident should be a stark reminder for residents to ensure that appliances are switched off before leaving their property, this includes both tumble dryers and washing machines.
I decided I would help my sister raise awareness for PKD - Polycystic kidney disease - by running with a tumble dryer on my back," he said.
Throughout the show Gigglebiz character Arthur Sleep gave a televised update on the whereabouts of Mr Tumble as the news of his circus becoming lost proved a problem.
The new model of strategic planning, flexible planning and planning tumble to meet changing circumstances of today's world and with the relevant degrees of success have been used efficiently
While active satellite and spacecraft rely on thrusters to control movement, retired space assets tumble at high speeds through their orbits.
D C Norris & Company (DCN) launched the latest addition to their range of Cook-Chill products - The DCN Tumble Heater 75 at Anuga Food Tec.