tuck

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Related to tucked: tucked away, tucked up

nip and tuck

1. noun A cosmetic surgery procedure, often (but not always) one performed on the face. Many women consider getting a nip and tuck as they age, but I think my wrinkles make me look distinguished.
2. noun A minor change to improve something, often the appearance of something. The house just needs a little nip and tuck before it is ready to go up for sale.
3. adjective Of a contest or competition, having a very close margin between the competitors. This race has been nip and tuck, and we won't know who has won until the final vote is counted.
4. adverb Very closely competing; head-to-head. The two teams went nip and tuck down to the final seconds of the game.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

Fig. almost even; almost tied. The horses ran nip and tuck for the first half of the race. Then my horse pulled ahead. In the football game last Saturday, both teams were nip and tuck throughout the game.
See also: and, nip, tuck

tuck into something

to begin eating something vigorously. The kids really tucked into the stew. I could see from the way that they tucked into their meal that they were really hungry.
See also: tuck

tuck someone in(to) something

 and tuck someone in
to place someone into something carefully; to wrap someone in blankets or something similar. Father tucked Jimmy into bed an hour later than he should have. Please tuck in Jimmy.
See also: tuck

tuck something around someone or something

to wrap something snugly around someone or something. I tucked crumpled newspapers around the cups in the box to keep them from breaking. Molly-Jo tucked the covers around the baby.
See also: around, tuck

tuck something away

 
1. Lit. to hide or store something away. Tuck this away where you can find it later. Can you tuck away this money somewhere?
2. Fig. to eat something. The boys tucked away three pizzas and an apple pie. When I was younger, I could tuck away my dinner in no time at all.
See also: away, tuck

tuck something in (to) something

 and tuck something in
to fold or stuff something into something. Please tuck your shirttail into your pants. Tuck in your shirt tail. When you make the bed, you have to tuck the sheets in.
See also: tuck

tuck something up

to raise up some part of one's clothing and attach it temporarily. She tucked her skirt up and waded through the flooded basement. She tucked up her skirt.
See also: tuck, up

tuck something up (under something)

to place or push something, such as cloth, up under something. Tuck the sheet up under the mattress when you make the bed. Tuck up the sheet under the mattress when you make the bed.
See also: tuck, up

tuck in somebody

also tuck somebody in
to cover a child comfortably in bed I tucked in Josh and Amy after reading them a story. Who's going to tuck me in while you're gone?
See also: tuck

tucked away

hidden or difficult to find Van's house is tucked away at the end of the road.
See also: away, tuck

a nip and (a) tuck

 
1. a medical operation to improve the appearance of your face I don't think you could look like that at her age without a little nip and tuck.
2. (American) small changes or reductions made in order to improve something A nip and a tuck in their household budget would give them the extra money they need.
See also: and, nip, tuck

be nip and tuck

  (American informal)
if two people who are competing are nip and tuck, they have almost the same number of points and either of them could win There's no saying who's going to win this game. It's been nip and tuck all the way.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

Very close so that the advantage or lead of competitors keeps shifting, as in It was nip and tuck whether they would deal with the bill before Congress adjourned. The precise allusion in this term has been lost. [Early 1800s] Also see neck and neck.
See also: and, nip, tuck

tuck away

1. Eat heartily, as in He tucked away an enormous steak. [Colloquial; mid-1800s] Also see tuck into.
2. Hide, put in storage, as in She had several hundred dollars tucked away. [c. 1900]
See also: away, tuck

tuck in

Thrust in the edge of or end of something, such as bed linens or a shirt; also, make a child secure in bed by folding in the bedclothes. For example, Tuck in your shirt; it looks awful hanging out of your pants, or Mother went upstairs to tuck in the children. [First half of 1600s]
See also: tuck

tuck into

Eat heartily or greedily, as in For a two-year-old he really tucked into his food. [Early 1800s]
See also: tuck

tuck away

v.
1. To put something in an out-of-the-way, snug place: She tucked away her wallet under all of the socks. He tucked the files away in the back of the filing cabinet. The cabin is tucked away in the mountains.
2. To store something in a safe spot; save something: The child tucked away some candy. I'll bet my neighbors have tucked millions of dollars away.
3. Slang To consume some food heartily: The hungry farmer tucked away three steaks. The food left over from lunch was gone by dinnertime, since I tucked it all away during the afternoon.
See also: away, tuck

tuck in

v.
1. To gather something up and fold, thrust, or turn in so as to secure or confine it: The teacher told the boys to tuck in their shirts. I threw the sheet over the bed and tucked it in at the corners.
2. To make someone secure in bed for sleep, especially by tucking bedclothes into the bed: I tucked in my daughter and said good night. The babysitter tucked the little boy in.
3. To draw in some body part; contract something: She tucked in her arms and shook her head. The turtle tucked in its head.
4. Slang To begin to eat heartily: Dinner was served, and we tucked in.
See also: tuck

tuck into

v.
1. To gather something up and fold or thrust it into something so as to secure or confine it: I wrote the number on a piece of paper and tucked it into my pocket.
2. To make someone secure in some bed for sleep, especially by tucking bedclothes into the bed: After the children put on their pajamas, I tucked them into bed.
3. Slang To begin to eat something heartily: We tucked into a stack of pancakes.
See also: tuck

tuck up

v.
1. To put someone or something in a snug spot: The babysitter tucked the children up soundly in bed. I tucked up the horses in the barn.
2. To put something in an out-of-the-way, snug place: The cabin was tucked up among the pines. I tucked my hair up under a wool cap.
3. To draw up some body part into a tuck position: The diver tucked up her legs for a somersault. The gymnast tucked his knees up to his chest during the dismount.
4. To assume a tuck position: The flight attendants advised the passengers to tuck up for a rough landing.
See also: tuck, up

nip and tuck

mod. so close as to be almost the same; neck and neck. They ran nip and tuck all the way to the finish line, but Tom won the race.
See also: and, nip, tuck
References in periodicals archive ?
When worn under a jacket or blazer, these are often tucked in.
Building on the recent launch of the Fruit of the Loom Stay-Tucked Crew, this quantitative study analyzed how a tucked shirt is indicative of more success in a man's personal and professional life.
The invention's unique design insures that shirts remained tucked in to pants at all times.
Versace shirts were tucked into its trademark white trousers, Bottega Veneta tucked into khaki trousers and Burberry tucked into Lord Lichfield-style trousers described as 'shrimp pink' in the US press.
Tucked, untucked, sloppy, well-dressed, there's no ``no-tuck rule'' here, so if you leave it exposed, you could lose it in a fumble.
The acquisitions announced today are easily tucked into ResCare's existing operations.
A perfected length so the shirt stays tucked all day
Tucked into the Cabrillo Beach area is a hidden treasure of the city's Recreation and Parks Department, the Cabrillo Marine Museum, which trains hundreds of volunteers each year from age 6 well past 60, handles a quarter of a million visitors and hosts 50,000 schoolchildren, mostly from Los Angeles Unified School District campuses spread all over our meandering city.
The Company has purchased the Jeep franchise in Brattleboro, Vermont, which will be tucked into its Brattleboro Chrysler Plymouth Dodge Dealership.
Diamond rings, cash and compacts (those teeny Estee Lauder designs) are easily tucked into plastic eggs, but for new ideas, try Motorola's new pagers in translucent colorful plastic for $80 at Circuit City, and Sony's first-ever portable Voice File IC Chip Recorder that's not much bigger than an Easter egg.
Hometown Auto has entered into an agreement to acquire Wellesley Mazda which will be tucked into the Bay State Lincoln Mercury dealership in Framingham, Massachusetts.
Upon receiving packages, end-customers have necessary information, and even a return label securely tucked in one neatly applied document.
P&D and Twin Ports each have annualized revenues of approximately $1 million and will be tucked into United Waste's operations in Albany and Duluth, respectively.