trust

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in trust

Especially of money or property, in the protection, care, or guardianship of a trustee. Following her parents' sudden deaths, the young heiress's fortune was held in trust by her paternal grandfather.
See also: trust

brain trust

A group of experts who are chosen to be advisors to a person in power and aid in making important decisions. All politicians need a brain trust to help guide them through the campaign process and stay informed of the important issues facing their constituency.
See also: brain, trust

*in the trust of someone

under the responsibility or in the care of someone. (*Typically: be ~; leave someone or something ~; place someone or something ~.) The state placed the orphan in the trust of the foster parents. Our bonds are left in the trust of our broker.
See also: of, trust

misplace one's trust (in someone)

to put trust in the wrong person; to put trust in someone who does not deserve it. The writer misplaced his trust in his editor. The voters misplaced their trust in the corrupt politician.
See also: trust

place one's trust in someone or something

to trust someone or something. If you place your trust in me, everything will work out all right. You should place your trust in your own proven talent.
See also: place, trust

put one's trust in someone or something

to trust someone or something. Will I never be able to put my trust in you? You can put your trust in the bank. Its deposits are insured.
See also: put, trust

Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry.

 and Keep your powder dry.
Prov. Have faith that God will make sure that you win a conflict, but be prepared to fight well and vigorously. (Supposed to have been said by Oliver Cromwell; powder means gunpowder.) Bill: Am I going to win my lawsuit? Alan: All you can do is put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry.
See also: and, dry, keep, powder, put, trust

restore someone's trust in something

 and restore someone's belief in something; restore someone's faith in something
to reinstate someone's belief, faith, trust, etc., in something. I knew that a good performance on the test would restore my parents' belief in me. Her faith was restored in the government.
See also: restore, trust

take something on trust

to accept that something is true through trust. I don't know if it's so, but I'll take it on trust. CH You will have to take it on trust because I can't prove it.
See also: on, take, trust

trust in someone or something

to believe in someone or something. Trust in me. I know what I am saying. Can I trust in the figures in this report?
See also: trust

Trust me!

I am telling you the truth. Please believe me. Tom said with great conviction, "Trust me! I know exactly what to do!" Mary: Do you really think we can keep this party a secret until Thursday? Sally: Trust me! I know how to plan a surprise party.
See also: trust

trust someone for something

to depend on someone for payment for something. I will lend you one hundred dollars. I know I can trust you for it. I loaned Ted a lot of money. It's all right. I can trust him for it.
See also: trust

trust someone or something to someone

to leave someone or something in the possession of someone whom you assume will take good care of someone or something. Can I trust my little Jimmy to you? I am perfectly comfortable trusting this money to you.
See also: trust

trust someone to do something

to believe that someone can be relied on to do something. You can trust her to be here on time. I can't trust myself to eat wisely.
See also: trust

trust someone with someone or something

to leave someone in the care of someone or something. Can I trust you with my uncle? He needs to have his medicine right on time. I am sure I can trust you with the money. Don't leave that cake with me. I can't trust myself with it.
See also: trust

a brain trust

  (American & Australian)
a group of people with special knowledge or skills who give advice to someone in a position of authority He joined the President's brain trust for the election campaign.
See also: brain, trust

tried and tested/trusted

  (British, American & Australian) also tried and true (American)
used by many people and proved to be effective They ran a highly successful advertising campaign using a tried and tested formula. Most people would prefer to stick to tried and true methods of birth control.
See also: and, test, tried

I wouldn't trust somebody as far as I could throw them.

  (informal)
something that you say which means that you do not trust someone at all I'll admit John is very charming, but I wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him.
See also: could, far, throw, trust

not trust somebody an inch

  (British & Australian)
to not trust someone at all He's charming enough but I wouldn't trust him an inch.
See also: inch, trust

brain trust

A group of experts who serve as unofficial but vital advisers. For example, Each town manager seemed to have his or her own brain trust, which of course changed with every election . This term, closely associated with President Franklin Roosevelt's advisers on domestic and foreign policy in the early 1930s, was first recorded in 1910.
See also: brain, trust

in trust

In the possession or care of a trustee, as in The money was held in trust for the children's education. This expression implies having confidence in someone (the trustee). [Mid-1500s]
See also: trust

trust in

v.
To depend on someone or something: The preacher told the congregation to trust in God.
See also: trust

trust to

v.
To depend on something: I'd rather plan my financial future than trust to luck.
See also: trust

trust with

v.
To grant discretion to someone confidently: Can you trust them with your credit card information?
See also: trust

Trust me!

exclam. Believe me!; Honestly! He actually said it just like Tom told you. Trust me!
See also: trust
References in classic literature ?
Umble as I am,' he wiped his hands harder, and looked at them and at the fire by turns, 'umble as my mother is, and lowly as our poor but honest roof has ever been, the image of Miss Agnes (I don't mind trusting you with my secret, Master Copperfield, for I have always overflowed towards you since the first moment I had the pleasure of beholding you in a pony-shay) has been in my breast for years.
How could she run the risk of trusting herself to such intimate companionship with a man whom she hadn't known half a dozen hours?
His puissance, trusting in th' Almightie's aide, I mean to try, whose Reason I have tri'd Unsound and false; nor is it aught but just, That he who in debate of Truth hath won, Should win in Arms, in both disputes alike Victor; though brutish that contest and foule, When Reason hath to deal with force, yet so Most reason is that Reason overcome.
He has stated such matters just as they occurred, and leaves every one to form his own opinion concerning them; trusting that his anxious desire to speak the unvarnished truth will gain for him the confidence of his readers.
I could never have been afraid of trusting you,' she returned, raising her eyes frankly to his face.
In this rational view, trust is an entity that individuals will evaluate with respect to the notion that a trusting relationship entails time-savings, savings of emotional energy, and results in benefits that are not present in non-trusting relationships (Jarvenpaa, Knoll, & Leidner, 1998).