trouser

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all mouth and no trousers

Full of boastful, arrogant, or shallow talk, usually by a male, who then cannot deliver on his claims. A variant of "all mouth and trousers," meaning the same thing. Primarily heard in UK. He talks a big game, but when it actually comes to asking out a woman, he's all mouth and no trousers.
See also: all, and, mouth, trouser

all mouth and trousers

Full of boastful, arrogant, or shallow talk, usually by a male, who then cannot deliver on his claims. The variant form, "all mouth and no trousers" (meaning the same), is also often used. Primarily heard in UK. I find that most of the men in the city are all mouth and trousers. They all act like they are God's gift to women, but I've yet to meet one who's at all interesting. The opposition party is all mouth and trousers, for they have no real plan to address the things they are criticizing.
See also: all, and, mouth, trouser

all talk and no trousers

Full of boastful, arrogant, or shallow talk that never materializes into results. A variant of "all mouth and trousers," meaning the same thing. Primarily heard in UK. The team's manager keeps promising title after title, but he's seeming like all talk and no trousers at this point.
See also: all, and, talk, trouser

in the trouser department

1. Literally, relating to or having to do with trousers or pants. Of course, in the trouser department, a nicely fitted pair of slacks will always look more respectable than tracksuit bottoms.
2. slang Relating to or concerning a man's penis or its physical aspects. Look at that guy in his big flashy sports car. I reckon it's compensation for not having much in the trouser department, eh?
See also: department, trouser

puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

A saying emphasizing that someone is just an ordinary human being. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in UK. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they put their trousers on one leg at a time, just like everybody else. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book provides a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her trousers on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. I might be the youngest billionaire in the world, but I still put my trousers on one leg at a time!
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, put, time, trouser

put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

To be an ordinary human being; to go through life like everyone else. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in UK. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they are just human beings who put their trousers on one leg at a time. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book gives you a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her trousers on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. Even though I made my millions at a young age, I was determined that I would still put my trousers on one leg at a time just like everybody else.
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, put, time, trouser

who wears the trousers?

Who is in charge of this situation? Typically used to describe who has more power in a relationship or household, with "trousers" denoting masculine authority, as women traditionally wore skirts throughout history. She won't let you go out with me tonight? Who wears the trousers in your relationship, man?
See also: wear, who

be caught with your pants/trousers down

 
1. to be suddenly discovered doing something that you did not want other people to know about, especially having sex Apparently he was caught with his pants down. His wife came home to find him in bed with the neighbour.
2. to be asked to do or say something that you are not prepared for He asked me where I'd been the previous evening and I was caught with my trousers down.
See wouldn't be caught dead, fall between two stools
See also: caught, down, pant

be all mouth

  (British, American & Australian informal) also be all mouth and (no) trousers (British informal)
if someone is all mouth, they talk a lot about doing something but they never do it She says she'll complain to the manager but I think she's all mouth. You're all mouth and no trousers. Why don't you just go over there and ask her out?
See also: all, mouth

wear the trousers

  (British, American & Australian humorous) also wear the pants (American & Australian humorous)
to be the person in a relationship who makes all the important decisions I don't think there's any doubt about who wears the trousers in their house.
See also: trouser, wear

trouser snake

and trouser trout
n. the penis. The doctor was taken aback when young Willard used the term “trouser snake.” Stop scratching your trouser trout in public.
See also: snake, trouser

trouser trout

verb
See also: trouser, trout
References in classic literature ?
If I was ever to be a lady, I'd give him a sky-blue coat with diamond buttons, nankeen trousers, a red velvet waistcoat, a cocked hat, a large gold watch, a silver pipe, and a box of money.
I put the shoes first advisedly, for they made an even deeper impression upon me than a seedy black coat, a pair of threadbare trousers, a flabby cravat, or a crumpled shirt collar.
The gas was half up, as I had left it, and my unhappy boy, dressed only in his shirt and trousers, was standing beside the light, holding the coronet in his hands.
The dresser went round the room, pulling out looking-glasses and pushing them in again, his dingy dark coat and trousers looking all the more dismal since he was still holding the festive fairy spear of King Oberon.
Had he consented to discard his trousers and gaiters like the rest of us, and to hunt in a flannel shirt and a pair of veldt-schoons, it would have been all right.
When they had finished their song the girl in white went up to the prompter's box and a man with tight silk trousers over his stout legs, and holding a plume and a dagger, went up to her and began singing, waving his arms about.
To find clothing seemed no easy task; but Tip boldly ransacked the great chest in which Mombi kept all her keepsakes and treasures, and at the very bottom he discovered some purple trousers, a red shirt and a pink vest which was dotted with white spots.
He shrugged his shoulders and thrust his fat little hands into his trousers pockets.
Here he held Martin off at arm's length and ran his beaming eyes over Martin's second-best suit, which was also his worst suit, and which was ragged and past repair, though the trousers showed the careful crease he had put in with Maria's flat-irons.
His teeth came together in the slack of the white duck trousers.
His sailor trousers were long and wide at the bottom, and the broad collar of his blouse had gold anchors sewed on its corners.
A battalion of waiters slid among the throng, carrying trays of beer glasses and making change from the inexhaustible vaults of their trousers pockets.
Genevieve slipped on a pair of Joe's shoes, light-soled and dapper, and laughed with Lottie, who stooped to turn up the trousers for her.
Removal of the casket from its box was less easy, but it was taken out, for it was a perquisite of Jess, who carefully unscrewed the cover and laid it aside, exposing the body in black trousers and white shirt.
Here follows the portrait of Monsieur Dutocq, order-clerk in the Rabourdin bureau: Thirty-eight years old, oblong face and bilious skin, grizzled hair always cut close, low forehead, heavy eyebrows meeting together, a crooked nose and pinched lips; tall, the right shoulder slightly higher than the left; brown coat, black waistcoat, silk cravat, yellowish trousers, black woollen stockings, and shoes with flapping bows; thus you behold him.