References in classic literature ?
I can't speak about it to them as are i' the place o' your parents, for that might bring worse trouble than's needful.
It is certain, so many overthrown estates, so many votes for troubles.
What troubles one has with these girls without their mother
The idea of trouble immediately connected itself with what had been unaccountable to her in him.
To avoid trouble and confusion, I have taken my pupils one by one, and discussed their various qualities; but this can give no adequate idea of being worried by the whole three together; when, as was often the case, all were determined to 'be naughty, and to tease Miss Grey, and put her in a passion.
Dear Miss Mills, tell me what to do, let me help you, I 'm ready for anything," said Polly, very humbly, for her own troubles looked so small and foolish beside the stern hardships which had nearly had so tragical an end, that she felt heartily ashamed of herself, and quite burned to atone for them.
That is a trouble which I cannot cure, my child; but I shall try to make you feel it less.
The trouble with you, Anne, is that you're thinking too much about yourself.
Why - there's awmost nobbody but has their troubles, missus.
He meant trouble that might be developed in going to Honduras, and starting the search for the lost city and the idol of gold.
The trouble is," sighed the Doctor, grasping her meaning intuitively, "that youth is given up to illusions.
It will make no difference if you do, in the gratitude I shall always feel for the trouble you took with me when I was a little girl.
I should never have got into that trouble if I'd been true to you--if I hadn't been a fool.
And if you don't help the other animals now, the lions may find themselves left all alone when THEY are in trouble.
But she was not altogether easy to bring up, and gave her parents much trouble and anxiety, for all summer she insisted on spending in the cellar, and in the winter she would sleep outside in the snow, and the colder it was the happier she seemed to be.