References in classic literature ?
She told me I might write her word after a while, how we went on, and how mother bore up under her trouble.
In many cases it is inevitable that the shame is felt to be the worst part of crime; and it would have required a great deal of disentangling reflection, such as had never entered into Rosamond's life, for her in these moments to feel that her trouble was less than if her husband had been certainly known to have done something criminal.
Dorothy laughed merrily at this speech, and then she became very sober again, for she could see how all this trouble was worrying her aunt and uncle, and knew that unless she found a way to help them their future lives would be quite miserable and unhappy.
She would even sympathise with me for the trouble I had with the children, and express at times, by half sentences, interspersed with nods and knowing winks, her sense of the injudicious conduct of their mamma in so restricting my power, and neglecting to support me with her authority.
What bit at his consciousness and was a painful incitement in it, was his desire to be with Skipper who was not right, and who was in trouble.
Dat bloke was a dandy," said Pete, in conclusion, "but he hadn' oughta made no trouble.
Polly felt it, and it did her good; hastily wiping the traitorous eyes, she laughed and said cheerfully, "There, I 'm all right again; thank you, don't trouble yourself with my parcels.
But Rose stuck there, and grew so red, her uncle guessed what that trouble was.
Allan that you can love right off without any trouble.
It is those bishops that trouble me,' said he; 'but the bold knight can overleap the reverend gentlemen,' taking my last bishop with his knight; 'and now, those sacred persons once removed, I shall carry all before me.
Louis, gazing fixedly, betrayed a trouble in his face he was not quite able to hide.
What is horrible in a trouble of this kind is that one cannot, as in any other--in loss, in death--bear one's trouble in peace, but that one must act," said he, as though guessing her thought.
With a large allowance for difference of tastes, and with all submission to the patricians of Coketown, this seemed so extraordinary a source of interest to take so much trouble about, that it perplexed him.
Libels and licentious discourses against the state, when they are frequent and open; and in like sort, false news often running up and down, to the disadvantage of the state, and hastily embraced; are amongst the signs of troubles.
He sees nothing beyond the pleasure of the moment, nothing troubles him and so he is always cheerful, satisfied, and serene.