trickle in

trickle in

1. Of a liquid, to flow or seep in(to something) in drops or a thin stream. I thought I had waterproofed the windows, but rain keeps trickling in. He noticed seawater trickling into the hull of the boat.
2. To slowly enter or become available. Students were still trickling in nearly 15 minutes after the lecture began. Once we get a bit of cash trickling in, we can start buying better equipment.
See also: trickle

trickle in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a liquid] to seep or dribble into something or a place. Some of the rainwater trickled into my car through a leak. It trickled in during the night.
2. Fig. [for someone or something] to come into something or a place, a few at a time. The audience trickled into the hall little by little. They trickled in over a period of an hour or more.
See also: trickle
References in periodicals archive ?
With third quarter life insurer earnings announcements starting tO trickle in, the question is: Will earnings continue the growth trend of the year's first two quarters?
Already, gym managers said they're seeing the guilty trickle in.