trial


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bring someone or something to trial

to bring a crime or a criminal into court for a trial. At last, the thugs were brought to trial. We brought the case to trial a week later.
See also: bring, trial

go to trial

[for a case] to go into court to be tried. When will this case go to trial? We go to trial next Monday.
See also: trial

on trial

 
1. [of someone] in a legal case before a judge. The criminal was on trial for over three months. lam not on trial. Don't treat me like that!
2. being tested; being examined or experimented with. The new strain of wheat is on trial in Kansas at the present time. The teaching method is on trial in the school system.
See also: on, trial

send someone or something up

 
1. Lit. to order someone to go upward to a higher level; to arrange for something to be taken upward to a higher level. I'll send up Gary. They are hungry on the tenth floor. Let's send some sandwiches up.
2. Fig. to parody or ridicule someone or something. Comedians love to send the president or some other famous person up. The comedian sent up the vice president.
See also: send, up

send someone up

Fig. to mock or ridicule, particularly by imitation. Last week, he sent the prime minister up. In his act, he sends up famous people.
See also: send, up

send up a trial balloon

to suggest something and see how people respond to it; to test public opinion. Mary had an excellent idea, but when we sent up a trial balloon, the response was very negative. Don't start the whole project without sending up a trial balloon.
See also: balloon, send, trial, up

stand trial

to be the accused person in a trial before a judge; to be on trial. He had to stand trial for perjury and obstruction of justice.
See also: stand, trial

trial and error

trying repeatedly for success. I finally found the right key after lots of trial and error. Sometimes trial and error is the only way to get something done.
See also: and, error, trial

trial balloon

a test of someone's or the public's reaction. It was just a trial balloon, and it didn't work. The trial balloon was a great success.
See also: balloon, trial

trials and tribulations

Cliché problems and tests of one's courage or perseverance. I suppose I have the normal trials and tribulations for a person of my background, but some days are just a little too much for me. I promise not to tell you of the trials and tribulations of my day if you promise not to tell me yours!
See also: and, trial, tribulation

on trial

being judged in a court of law He was on trial for burglary.
See also: on, trial

stand trial

to appear in a court of law to be judged guilty or not guilty of doing something He is scheduled to stand trial for murder this summer.
See also: stand, trial

on trial

1. In the process of being tried, especially in a court of law. For example, He would be put on trial for the murder of his wife. [Early 1700s]
2. As a test of something, on probation, as in They said we could take the vacuum cleaner on trial and return it if it was too noisy. [Early 1700s]
See also: on, trial

send up

1. Put in prison, as in He'll be sent up for at least ten years. [Mid-1800s]
2. Cause to rise, as in The emissions sent up by that factory are clearly poisonous. [Late 1500s]
3. Satirize, make a parody of, as in This playwright has a genius for sending up suburban life. [First half of 1900s]
4. send up a trial balloon. See trial balloon.
See also: send, up

trial and error

An attempt to accomplish something by trying various means until the correct one is found. for example, The only way to solve this problem is by trial and error. The error here alludes to the failed means or attempts, which are discarded until the right way is found. [c. 1800]
See also: and, error, trial

trial balloon

An idea or plan advanced tentatively to test public reaction, as in Let's send up a trial balloon for this new program before we commit ourselves. This expression alludes to sending up balloons to test weather conditions. [c. 1930]
See also: balloon, trial

trial by fire

A test of one's abilities to perform well under pressure, as in Finishing this buge list of chores in time for the wedding is really a trial by fire. This expression alludes to the medieval practice of determining a person's guilt by having them undergo an ordeal, such as walking barefoot through a fire.
See also: fire, trial

trials and tribulations

Tests of one's patience or endurance, as in She went through all the trials and tribulations of being admitted to law school only to find she couldn't afford to go . This redundant expression- trial and tribulation here both mean the same thing-is also used semi-humorously, as in Do you really want to hear about the trials and tribulations of my day at the office?
See also: and, trial, tribulation

send up

v.
1. To send someone to jail: They sent the crook up for ten years. The cops busted the gang and sent up the leader.
2. To make a parody of someone or something: The comedian sends up contemporary culture. I'm not afraid to send myself up to make people laugh.
See also: send, up

trial balloon

n. a test of someone’s reaction. It was just a trial balloon, and it didn’t work.
See also: balloon, trial

on trial

In the process of being tried, as in a court of law.
See also: on, trial

trial by fire

A test of one's abilities, especially the ability to perform well under pressure.
See also: fire, trial
References in classic literature ?
He also brought a great ball of lard from what they had in the house, and the suitors warmed the bow and again made trial of it, but they were none of them nearly strong enough to string it.
Put it on one side--as for the axes they can stay where they are, for no one is likely to come to the house and take them away: let the cupbearer go round with his cups, that we may make our drink-offerings and drop this matter of the bow; we will tell Melanthius to bring us in some goats tomorrow--the best he has; we can then offer thigh bones to Apollo the mighty archer, and again make trial of the bow, so as to bring the contest to an end.
was lying in the Tombs Prison, New York City, awaiting trial for murder.
Romaines, one of the tools in this affair, like Pervaise, was lying in jail in another state, Kansas, awaiting trial, when he was approached by the agents of the capitalists.
It is not, however, my intention to report in detail the course of the trial.
When the trial was resumed, Maitre Henri Robert questioned Daddy Mathieu as to his complicity in the death of the keeper.
There are many incidents given in the trial that point to Alan's fiery spirit and Highland quickness to take offence.
If you ever read this tale, you will likely ask yourself more questions than I should care to answer: as for instance how the Appin murder has come to fall in the year 1751, how the Torran rocks have crept so near to Earraid, or why the printed trial is silent as to all that touches David Balfour.
Occasionally other trials than those of the Old Bailey would be included in the package of books we received from London; among these my husband found and read with avidity:--
As the trial had proceeded, her countenance had altered.
My own agitation and anguish was extreme during the whole trial.
Data on the number of clinical trials conducted in North America, South and Central America, Europe, Middle-East and Africa and Asia-pacific and top five national contributions in each, along with the clinical trial scenario in BRIC nations
To consider this issue, we look at a program with which we are very familiar: the world of intercollegiate mock trial teams competing under the auspices of the American Mock Trial Association (AMTA).
Unnecessary and badly presented clinical research injures volunteers and patients as surely as any other form of bad medicine, as well as wasting resources and abusing the trust placed in investigators by their trial participants.
Tax Court Rule 183 delineates the procedural framework and substantive standards governing that court's review of special trial judge findings.