References in classic literature ?
After this I had the beautiful fruit of these trees carefully guarded by my most faithful servants; but every year, on this very night, the fruit was plucked and stolen by an invisible hand, and next morning not a single apple remained on the trees.
Crouched close to the great ape in the crotch of a tree the boy had shivered through an almost sleepless night.
Presently the trees grew thinner, and the shrubby undergrowth more abundant.
The autumnal tints of our American forests, glorious as they are, sink into nothing in comparison with this tree.
I never put my axe into a stunty tree, or one that hasn’t a good, fresh-looking bark: for trees have disorders, like creatur’s; and where’s the policy of taking a tree that’s sickly, any more than you’d choose a foundered horse to ride post, or an over heated ox to do your logging?
And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy's basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time.
The unicorn ran against the tree with all its strength, and stuck its horn so fast in the trunk that it had not the strength enough to draw it out again, and thus it was caught.
He was, I should say, a hundred yards in advance of his closest companion, and so I called to Tars Tarkas to ascend a great tree that brushed the cliff's face while I dispatched the fellow, thus giving the less agile Thark an opportunity to reach the higher branches before the entire horde should be upon us and every vestige of escape cut off.
Tarzan swung himself to the trees once more, and with swift noiselessness sped along high above the trail.
The light from one lantern fell upon a few ropes, a few planks of the deck, and the rail of the boat, but beyond that there was unbroken darkness, no light reached their faces, or the trees which were massed on the sides of the river.
As his eyes became accustomed to the dim light various objects in the home under the trees took shape; but the only one on which his greedy gaze rested, long sought for and found at last, was the great bed.
Notwithstanding our danger I could not help but laugh at Perry's frantic capers as he essayed to gain the safety of the lower branches of the trees he now had reached.
Close by were many trees bearing large, hard fruits and to one of these the ape-man swung with the agility of a squirrel.
Leisurely he gathered up the six pelts and one of the carcasses, and as the lioness appeared between the boles of two trees he swung upward into the branches above him.
Moving leisurely, sometimes upon the ground and again among the lower branches of the trees, gathering an occasional fruit or turning over a fallen log in search of the larger bugs, which he still found as palatable as of old, Tarzan had covered a mile or more when his attention was attracted by the scent of Sheeta up-wind ahead of him.