travel

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mile a minute

At a very rapid pace. Taylor was so excited to tell me about her first day at school that she was talking a mile a minute.
See also: mile, minute

at a good clip

Quickly; at a good pace. That horse is moving at a good clip—I think he might win the race!
See also: clip, good

bad news travels fast

Bad news circulates quickly (because people are apt to hear it and then share it with others). A: "How does the whole school already know that I got suspended?" B: "Well, bad news travels fast."
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

*at a good clip

 and *at a fast clip
rapidly. (*Typically: go ~; move ~; run ~; travel ~.) We were moving along at a good clip when a state trooper stopped us.
See also: clip, good

Bad news travels fast.

Prov. Information about trouble or misfortune disseminates quickly (more quickly than good news). John: Hi, Andy. I'm sorry to hear you got fired. Andy: How did you know about that already? It only happened this morning. John: Bad news travels fast. I called my mother to tell her about my car accident, but my aunt had already told her. Bad news travels fast.
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

He travels fastest who travels alone.

Prov. It is easier to achieve your goals if you do not have a spouse, children, or other connections to consider. Jill: Don't go yet! Wait for me to get ready. Jane: But you always take at least half an hour. No wonder they always say that he travels fastest who travels alone.
See also: alone, fast, he, travel, who

*in a body

Fig. as a group of people; as a group; in a group. (*Typically: arrive some place ~; go ~; leave ~; reach some place ~; travel ~.) The tour members always traveled in a body.
See also: body

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Prov. You should enjoy the process of doing something, rather than anticipate the result of doing it. Bill: I can't wait till I get my high school diploma. Fred: You should concentrate on enjoying high school instead. It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
See also: arrive, better, travel

*mile a minute

Fig. very fast. (*Typically: go ~; move ~; talk ~; travel ~.) She talks a mile a minute and is very hard to keep up with.
See also: mile, minute

*off the beaten track

 and *off the beaten path
Fig. away from the frequently traveled routes. (*Typically: be ~; go ~; travel ~.) We found a nice little Italian restaurant off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel across something

to make a journey across something or some place. We have to travel across the desert to get there. I do not want to travel across that rickety bridge on the way back.
See also: across, travel

Travel broadens the mind.

Prov. When you travel, you learn things about the people and places you see. Marie: I never realized how well-off most Americans are until I visited India. Jane: So it's true that travel broadens the mind, huh? Everyone who gets the chance should go abroad. Travel broadens the mind.
See also: broaden, mind, travel

travel by something

 
1. to make a journey, using a particular conveyance. I will go by train, since I don't like to travel by plane. We traveled by car, since that is the cheapest.
2. to make a journey under particular conditions. I don't ever travel by night. We like to travel by day so we can see the scenery.
See also: travel

travel for someone or something

to go from place to place selling for someone or a company. Walter travels for his uncle, who runs a toy factory. She travels for a company that makes men's clothing.
See also: travel

travel on something

 
1. to make a journey on a particular conveyance. Do you like to travel on the train? I do not care to travel on the bus.
2. to travel having certain bodily states, such as on an empty stomach, on a full stomach. I hate traveling on a full stomach. I can't stand to travel on a full stomach.
See also: on, travel

travel over something

 
1. to go over something as part of a journey. We had to travel over an old bridge over the Mississippi to get to my sister's house. We will travel over a long narrow strip of land to get to the marina.
2. to travel widely over a great area. She spent the summer traveling over Europe. I have traveled over the entire country and never failed to find someone I could talk to.
See also: travel

travel through something

 
1. to make a journey through some area or country. We will have to travel through Germany to get there. Do you want to travel through the desert or through the mountains?
2. to make a journey through some kind of weather condition. I hate to travel through the rain. I refuse to travel through a snowstorm.
See also: through, travel

travel with someone

 
1. to associate with someone; to move about in association with someone. She travels with a sophisticated crowd. I am afraid that Walter is traveling with the wrong group of friends.
2. to make a journey with someone. Do you mind if I travel with you? Who are you going to travel with?
See also: travel

travel with something

to have something with one as one travels. I always travel with extra money. I hate to travel with three suitcases. That is more than I can handle.
See also: travel

off the beaten track

not known or popular with many people off the beaten path Her tastes in reading tend to be off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel light

to bring very few things with you when you go on a trip My new car has lots of cargo space, which is great for people like me who don't travel light.
See also: light, travel

Have something will travel!

  (humorous)
something that you say which means you have the skills or equipment that are necessary to do a particular activity and you are ready to do it anywhere Have teaching qualification will travel!
See also: have, will

off the beaten track

An unusual route or destination, as in We found a great vacation spot, off the beaten track. This term alludes to a well-worn path trodden down by many feet and was first recorded in 1860, although the phrase beaten track was recorded in 1638 in reference to the usual, unoriginal way of doing something.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel light

Take little baggage; also, be relatively free of responsibilities or deep thoughts, as in I can be ready in half an hour; I always travel light, or I don't want to buy a house and get tied down; I like to travel light, or It's hard to figure out whom they'll attack next, because ideologically they travel light . The literal use dates from the 1920s, the figurative from the mid-1900s.
See also: light, travel
References in classic literature ?
Freely, who, like many other travelled men, was not master of the English language.
The rest of the journey, save the last short stretch to Dyea, would be travelled on Canadian territory.
As yet, that winter, no one had travelled the river south of Forty Mile, and, for that matter, the whole winter through they might be the only ones to travel it.
The Colorado, as I have already said, is nearly eighty miles distant: and as we travelled slowly, we were two days and a half on the road.
For several miles we travelled along the valley of the Colorado.
A short time before, a body of Indians had travelled past in the night; if they had been aware of the posta, our black friend and his four soldiers would assuredly have been slaughtered.
They now travelled some miles without speaking to each other, during which suspense of discourse Jones often sighed, and Benjamin groaned as bitterly, though from a very different reason.
And at this the reader will be the less inclined to wonder, if he pleases to recollect the doubtful phrase in which Jones first communicated his resolution to Mr Partridge; and, indeed, had the words been less ambiguous, Partridge might very well have construed them as he did; being persuaded as he was that the whole nation were of the same inclination in their hearts; nor did it stagger him that Jones had travelled in the company of soldiers; for he had the same opinion of the army which he had of the rest of the people.
I MENTIONED before that I had a great mind to see the whole island, and that I had travelled up the brook, and so on to where I built my bower, and where I had an opening quite to the sea, on the other side of the island.
I never travelled in this journey above two miles outright in a day, or thereabouts; but I took so many turns and re-turns to see what discoveries I could make, that I came weary enough to the place where I resolved to sit down all night; and then I either reposed myself in a tree, or surrounded myself with a row of stakes set upright in the ground, either from one tree to another, or so as no wild creature could come at me without waking me.
Thus our travelling in the retinue of the mandarin, though it was a great act of kindness, was not such a mighty favour to us, but was a great advantage to him, considering there were above thirty other people travelled in the same manner besides us, under the protection of his retinue; for the country furnished all the provisions for nothing to him, and yet he took our money for them.
I must confess I travelled more pleasantly afterwards in the deserts and vast wildernesses of Grand Tartary than here, and yet the roads here are well paved and well kept, and very convenient for travellers; but nothing was more awkward to me than to see such a haughty, imperious, insolent people, in the midst of the grossest simplicity and ignorance; and my friend Father Simon and I used to be very merry upon these occasions, to see their beggarly pride.
Now and then, a village with its modest spire, thatched roofs, and gable-ends, would peep out from among the trees; and, more than once, a distant town, with great church towers looming through its smoke, and high factories or workshops rising above the mass of houses, would come in view, and, by the length of time it lingered in the distance, show them how slowly they travelled.
How every circumstance of her short, eventful life, came thronging into her mind, as they travelled on