travel


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mile a minute

At a very rapid pace. Taylor was so excited to tell me about her first day at school that she was talking a mile a minute.
See also: mile, minute

*at a good clip

 and *at a fast clip
rapidly. (*Typically: go ~; move ~; run ~; travel ~.) We were moving along at a good clip when a state trooper stopped us.
See also: clip, good

Bad news travels fast.

Prov. Information about trouble or misfortune disseminates quickly (more quickly than good news). John: Hi, Andy. I'm sorry to hear you got fired. Andy: How did you know about that already? It only happened this morning. John: Bad news travels fast. I called my mother to tell her about my car accident, but my aunt had already told her. Bad news travels fast.
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

He travels fastest who travels alone.

Prov. It is easier to achieve your goals if you do not have a spouse, children, or other connections to consider. Jill: Don't go yet! Wait for me to get ready. Jane: But you always take at least half an hour. No wonder they always say that he travels fastest who travels alone.
See also: alone, fast, he, travel, who

*in a body

Fig. as a group of people; as a group; in a group. (*Typically: arrive some place ~; go ~; leave ~; reach some place ~; travel ~.) The tour members always traveled in a body.
See also: body

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Prov. You should enjoy the process of doing something, rather than anticipate the result of doing it. Bill: I can't wait till I get my high school diploma. Fred: You should concentrate on enjoying high school instead. It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
See also: arrive, better, travel

*mile a minute

Fig. very fast. (*Typically: go ~; move ~; talk ~; travel ~.) She talks a mile a minute and is very hard to keep up with.
See also: mile, minute

*off the beaten track

 and *off the beaten path
Fig. away from the frequently traveled routes. (*Typically: be ~; go ~; travel ~.) We found a nice little Italian restaurant off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel across something

to make a journey across something or some place. We have to travel across the desert to get there. I do not want to travel across that rickety bridge on the way back.
See also: across, travel

Travel broadens the mind.

Prov. When you travel, you learn things about the people and places you see. Marie: I never realized how well-off most Americans are until I visited India. Jane: So it's true that travel broadens the mind, huh? Everyone who gets the chance should go abroad. Travel broadens the mind.
See also: broaden, mind, travel

travel by something

 
1. to make a journey, using a particular conveyance. I will go by train, since I don't like to travel by plane. We traveled by car, since that is the cheapest.
2. to make a journey under particular conditions. I don't ever travel by night. We like to travel by day so we can see the scenery.
See also: travel

travel for someone or something

to go from place to place selling for someone or a company. Walter travels for his uncle, who runs a toy factory. She travels for a company that makes men's clothing.
See also: travel

travel on something

 
1. to make a journey on a particular conveyance. Do you like to travel on the train? I do not care to travel on the bus.
2. to travel having certain bodily states, such as on an empty stomach, on a full stomach. I hate traveling on a full stomach. I can't stand to travel on a full stomach.
See also: on, travel

travel over something

 
1. to go over something as part of a journey. We had to travel over an old bridge over the Mississippi to get to my sister's house. We will travel over a long narrow strip of land to get to the marina.
2. to travel widely over a great area. She spent the summer traveling over Europe. I have traveled over the entire country and never failed to find someone I could talk to.
See also: travel

travel through something

 
1. to make a journey through some area or country. We will have to travel through Germany to get there. Do you want to travel through the desert or through the mountains?
2. to make a journey through some kind of weather condition. I hate to travel through the rain. I refuse to travel through a snowstorm.
See also: travel

travel with someone

 
1. to associate with someone; to move about in association with someone. She travels with a sophisticated crowd. I am afraid that Walter is traveling with the wrong group of friends.
2. to make a journey with someone. Do you mind if I travel with you? Who are you going to travel with?
See also: travel

travel with something

to have something with one as one travels. I always travel with extra money. I hate to travel with three suitcases. That is more than I can handle.
See also: travel

off the beaten track

not known or popular with many people off the beaten path Her tastes in reading tend to be off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel light

to bring very few things with you when you go on a trip My new car has lots of cargo space, which is great for people like me who don't travel light.
See also: light, travel

Have something will travel!

  (humorous)
something that you say which means you have the skills or equipment that are necessary to do a particular activity and you are ready to do it anywhere Have teaching qualification will travel!
See also: have, will

off the beaten track

An unusual route or destination, as in We found a great vacation spot, off the beaten track. This term alludes to a well-worn path trodden down by many feet and was first recorded in 1860, although the phrase beaten track was recorded in 1638 in reference to the usual, unoriginal way of doing something.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel light

Take little baggage; also, be relatively free of responsibilities or deep thoughts, as in I can be ready in half an hour; I always travel light, or I don't want to buy a house and get tied down; I like to travel light, or It's hard to figure out whom they'll attack next, because ideologically they travel light . The literal use dates from the 1920s, the figurative from the mid-1900s.
See also: light, travel
References in classic literature ?
To make matters worse, this dangerous river travel could not be done in the dark, and their working day was reduced to the six hours of twilight.
But I say we must buy grub, and they say we must travel light and fast.
We leave Anvig with little grub, and travel light and fast.
I kill it with the axe as I go by, as I kill one of my dogs which loses its legs and can travel no more.
He says it is a man with one eye who gives him the letter, a man who travels fast down the Yukon.
But, though Sophia had great curiosity to know why the other lady continued to travel on through the same bye-roads with herself, nay, though this gave her some uneasiness, yet fear, or modesty, or some other consideration, restrained her from asking the question.
But what people ever travel across the country from Upton hither, especially to London?
Now, would a woman of her quality travel without a footman, unless upon some such extraordinary occasion?
Recession & Travel Industry Dynamics Shape Trends in Online
Travel agents, faced with dwindling commission rates on ticket sales and declining use of their services, have turned to selling travel insurance to make a profit.
One trend, recently discussed at the 22nd Annual Caribbean Tourism Conference held in Jamaica in September 1998, is to design travel programs to appeal to the diverse African-American Market.
Figure 30: Top five destinations for Australian outbound travel, 2002-20
April 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Nippon Travel Agency, a Japanese company with $5 billion in total sales, has joined IVI Travel and eight other multinational firms as a primary partner in Business Travel International.
NEW YORK -- First sentence of release dated February 15, 2007 should read: Business travel costs are expected to reach new highs in 2007, as The American Express Business Travel Forecast indicates a three to six percent increase in U.
SOUTHLAKE, Texas -- Sabre Travel Network, the world's largest and most rewarding marketplace for buying and selling travel, today announced that executive Tom Klein was named as a recipient of the travel industry's prestigious 25 Most Influential Executives of 2006 as awarded by Business Travel News (BTN).