Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

be on the gravy train

To be in a state, position, or job where one makes an excessive amount of money without expending much or any effort. I'll be on the gravy train once I get paid from the settlement of the lawsuit! My brother has been on the gravy train ever since he married his wife, whose family owns one of the largest oil companies in the world.
See also: gravy, train

on the gravy train

In a state, position, or job where one makes an excessive amount of money without expending much or any effort. I'll be on the gravy train once I get paid from the settlement of the lawsuit! My brother ended up on the gravy train when he married his wife, whose family owns one of the largest oil companies in the world.
See also: gravy, train

pull a train

vulgar slang Of a woman, to have sex with two or more men sequentially or at the same time. Things were starting to get weird with my boyfriend already, but when he said he wanted me to pull a train with him and some of his friends, I knew the relationship was over.
See also: pull, train

train wreck

1. A major or total failure, disaster, or catastrophe. This project has become an absolute train wreck. We've wasted so much time and money already, I don't know how we'll make up the losses. Despite a stellar cast, the film turned out to be a real train wreck.
2. A person whose life is a complete mess or is in total disarray. I don't know about my relationship with Kevin. He's a bit of a train wreck, between you and me.
See also: train, wreck

lose one's train of thought

Fig. to forget what one was talking or thinking about. Excuse me, I lost my train of thought. What was I talking about? Your question made the speaker lose her train of thought.
See also: lose, of, thought, train

ride the gravy train

Fig. to live in ease or luxury. 1/7 had a million dollars, I sure could ride the gravy train. I wouldn't like loafing if I were rich. I don't want to ride the gravy train.
See also: gravy, ride, train

someone's train of thought

Fig. someone's pattern of thinking or sequence of ideas; what one was just thinking about. (See also .) My train of thought is probably not as clear as it should be. I cannot seem to follow your train of thought on this matter. Will you explain it a little more carefully, please?
See also: of, thought, train

train for something

to practice or drill for some task. I am training for the marathon. We all have to train for the upcoming football season.
See also: train

train one's sights on something

 and have one's sights trained on something
Fig. to have something as a goal; to direct something or oneself toward a goal. (Alludes to someone using the sights of a gun to aim it. Note plural use of sights.) You should train your sights on getting a promotion in the next year. Lisa has her sights trained on a new car.
See also: sight, train

train someone in something

to drill and practice someone in a particular skill or body of knowledge. Her mentor trained her in the art of argumentation. I will try to train you in the skills needed to perform this task.
See also: train

train someone on something

to educate someone in the use of something. We trained him on the high diving board, but he isn't ready for competition yet. She trained herself on the computer so she could write a book.
See also: train

train (someone or an animal) as something

to educate someone or an animal to serve in a particular way. We trained him as a first-rate mechanic. I trained my cocker spaniel as a moderately effective watchdog.
See also: train

train (someone or an animal) for something

to educate someone or an animal for some purpose. His parents trained him for work in the family business. He was trained for factory work.
See also: train

train something on (someone, something, or an animal)

to aim something at someone, something, or an animal. Dave trained the spotlight on Fred, who was just coming out of the building. Train your lens on that bush. There is a deer back there.
See also: train

train up to something

to practice or drill up to a certain level of proficiency. I don't have enough stamina for the marathon now, but I am training up to it. Alice trained up to the long-distance swim for years.
See also: train, up

the gravy train

an activity from which people make a lot of money very quickly and easily A lot of people thought they'd get on the gravy train in the eighties and make some money out of property.
See also: gravy, train

set in train

if you set in train an activity or an event, you make it begin His book set in train the events which eventually led to revolution.
See also: set, train

a train of thought

a series of connected thoughts You interrupted my train of thought - Now I can't remember what I was going to say.
See set in train
See also: of, thought, train

gravy train, ride the

Experience excessive ease, success, or profit, especially undeservedly. For example, Now that his brother is paying all his bills, Jim is riding the gravy train. The word gravy has long meant "easy profits," and the term is believed to come from 19th-century railroad slang, although the earliest recorded use dates from the early 1900s. W.C. Handy used it in one of his famous blues songs written in 1914, in which he bemoans falling off the gravy train. Also see easy street.
See also: gravy, ride

train of thought

A succession of connected ideas, a path of reasoning, as in You've interrupted my train of thought; now what was I saying? This idiom, which uses train in the sense of "an orderly sequence," was first recorded in 1651, in philosopher Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan.
See also: of, thought, train

train on

To focus or aim something at some goal, mark, or target; direct something at someone or something: The guards trained their rifles on us as we approached the gate.
See also: train

gravy train

n. a job that brings in a steady supply of easy money or gravy. This kind of job is a real gravy train.
See also: gravy, train
References in classic literature ?
My sole recollection, from the time I fell under the trees until I awoke the following evening, is of my head out of the window, facing the wind caused by the train, cinders striking and burning and blinding me, while I breathed with will.
The sky had clouded, and the train rushed on like a sullen thunderbolt through the gray pall of advancing day.
In the suburbs the morning papers came on board the train.
I guess the Iron Heel won't need our services," Hartman remarked, putting down the paper he had been reading, when the train pulled into the central depot.
He turned and looked down the train as we alighted.
Almost as he spoke a special train with one carriage took the curve of the line on their left, and, stopping, disgorged another group of policemen, in whose midst was the hangdog visage of Magnus, the absconded servant.
When he spoke everyone instantly understood how this voice had stopped a train.
A faint scorn widened the slit-like mouth, and the whistle of an approaching train seemed oddly to echo the mockery.
The tail of his sentence was drowned in the roar of the train as it went rocking and clanking; but through all the hell of noises to which that unhappy house was periodically subject, they could hear the syllables of Magnus's answer, in all their bell-like distinctness: "I have no reason to feel confidence in Sir Aaron's family.
Merton had sometimes wondered if she had learnt to quail at the crash of the passing trains.
Can I beg a seat in your compartment, or anywhere in the train, as far as Harwich?
He drove up just two minutes after the train had gone, came straight into the office and ordered a special.
Here comes the train, sir - just one saloon and the guard's van.
The little train backed slowly along the platform side.
The tremendous rain occasioned infinite confusion, when the train stopped at its destination.