trade off


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trade something off

 
1. Lit. to get rid of something in an exchange. I traded my car off. I traded off my old car for a new one.
2. Fig. to sacrifice something in an exchange. You may end up trading job security off for more money. Don't trade off your job security.
See also: off, trade

trade off

Exchange one thing for another, especially as a compromise. For example, They were willing to trade off some vacation for the freedom to work flexible hours. This idiom gave rise to tradeoff for "an exchange." [First half of 1800s]
See also: off, trade

trade off

v.
To take turns: My roommate and I trade off washing the dishes.
See also: off, trade
References in periodicals archive ?
At the architectural level, the new AccelChip DSP Synthesis tool allows designers to trade off area, performance, and power where designs can be moved more than 100x.
the first day of the trade off the main Tradesight report.
IBCS shall generate revenue through this new subscription service, which includes the set-up of accounts, and all the information needed to be able to trade off shore - focused exclusively on small company stocks listed on the Australian Stock Exchange.
Dewey Burchett added, "As earnings season winds down, investors will be forced to balance the trade off between lower interest rates versus poor corporate profits.
TRADE OFF, winner of the 2000 Seattle International Film Festival "Space Needle" Award for Best Documentary, opens December 1 at Seattle's one-of-a-kind Cinerama Theatre.
The company's stock will continue to trade off the exchange, although the liquidity of the stock may be affected.
In addition, everyone in the organization must understand and develop criteria for making trade offs.