tourist trap


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

tourist trap

n. a place set up to lure tourists in to spend money. (Can be a shop, a town, or a whole country.) It looked like a tourist trap, so we didn’t even stop the car.
See also: trap
References in periodicals archive ?
The story of EatWith began one memorable evening in 2010 when EatWith co-founder and CEO Guy Michlin was vacationing in Crete: "After 4 days of falling into every possible tourist trap, we managed to get an invitation to dine with a local family.
Plus, everything is so expensive (as is in most tourist trap cities) that even breakfast feels like a scam.
Even the people in Peru do not think that this city is the most exciting in the worldamost travellers have called this place a tourist trap, ugly, and downright boring.
The central library is more of a tourist trap than a community facility," Mr Jaddoo said.
AN industrial unit - the base for a booming micro-brewery - has beaten some of Birmingham's best-known attractions to become the city's top tourist trap.
OKay, it's not a high-tech tourist trap but it has a QUIRKY charm that maKes it a must-see for everyone in the town at least once.
The Albert Dock marked a quarter of a century since its transformation into a top tourist trap with a free family fun weekend, including live music displays, street performances and a supercar show.
TOURIST TRAP Z Staff didn't panic and managed to capture the snake in a box
A COVENTRY charity will carry out street walks once a week with the aim of helping homeless people in tourist trap Stratford.
We're happy with our own company - but we like to see the real world where ordinary people live, not a purpose-built tourist trap.
Tony d'Avanzo has solved a problem at his Rolls Royce bed and breakfast in the Cotswold tourist trap of Bourton-on-the-Water--and next door's dog is as sick as the proverbial parrot
Ogden, Charles TOURIST TRAP (Edgar and Ellen Series, #2).
Under the smiling, sugarcoated tourist trap facade lies a complicated web of deceit, greed and murder.
Although Cuba was once a generous mixture of Europeans, West Africans and Chinese, today there remain only 300 pure Chinese and Chinatown has become a tourist trap.
The name of which horse running today could also be: (a) a tourist trap in London (b) a hirsute fruit (c) a biography of Led Zeppelin (d) a less-than-warm spice (e) a sorcerous bit on the side?