touch (oneself)

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touch (oneself)

euphemistic slang To masturbate. My ultra-religious aunt scared us silly when we went through puberty with all sorts of myths about what would happen if we touched ourselves.
See also: touch

touch

1. n. a likely target for begging; someone who is asked for a loan. (see also soft touch.) He was just the kind of touch we were looking for, not too bright and not too poor.
2. n. a request for money (from a beggar); a request for a loan. I ignored the touch and walked on by.
3. tv. to ask someone for a loan. He touched me for a hundred bucks.
4. n. a small portion of something to eat or drink. (Folksy.) I’ll have just a touch. I’m on a diet, you know.
5. tv. to deal with or handle someone or something. (Usually in the negative.) Mr. Wilson is a real pain, and I wouldn’t touch his account. Find somebody else to handle it.

touch

base/bases Informal
To renew a line of communication: "He went out of his way to touch base with a broad cross section of ... residents" (George B. Merry).
References in classic literature ?
I shall ask you to accept a little present from me, among the other offerings that are made to you before the wedding day.
Mr and Mrs Wilfer had seen a full quarter of a hundred more anniversaries of their wedding day than Mr and Mrs Lammle had seen of theirs, but they still celebrated the occasion in the bosom of their family.
Well, Ma,' returned Lavvy, 'since you will force it out of me, I must respectfully take leave to say that your family are no doubt under the greatest obligations to you for having an annual toothache on your wedding day, and that it's very disinterested in you, and an immense blessing to them.
The following report of the proceedings on the wedding day may be depended upon, as coming from eye-witnesses.
At my father's desire I was married to a prince who was my own cousin; but on my very wedding day, I was snatched up by a genius, and brought here in a faint.
For the morrow was their wedding day, and their house of dreams awaited them on the misty, purple shore of Four Winds Harbor.
There was the garnet set which Aunt March wore when she came out, the pearls her father gave her on her wedding day, her lover's diamonds, the jet mourning rings and pins, the queer lockets, with portraits of dead friends and weeping willows made of hair inside, the baby bracelets her one little daughter had worn, Uncle March's big watch, with the red seal so many childish hands had played with, and in a box all by itself lay Aunt March's wedding ring, too small now for her fat finger, but put carefully away like the most precious jewel of them all.
And you have heard his adventures on the anniversary of his wedding day.
There was a certain triteness in these reflections: they were those habitual to young men on the approach of their wedding day.
When it is made we do all of the testing and finishing touches ourselves here in our own workshop.