take vows

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take vows

To commit oneself to a religious order. Yes, I am taking vows and devoting my life to God. My brother has taken vows and joined the priesthood.
See also: take
References in periodicals archive ?
The 'sworn virgins' of the western Balkans took vows of chastity, dressed and lived like men to avoid the harsh treatment women usually experienced.
Given that Franciscan friars, who developed Monterey Jack cheese a few hundred years ago in California, took vows of poverty, they might not have appreciated a restaurant misspelling their creation as "monetary" jack.
They took vows and committed themselves to God," the source said.
In fact, she became the first black Religious Sister of Mercy when she took vows in 1956.
In Tractate Nedarim, however, the Talmud showed that people often took vows for less elevated reasonsout of pique or spite, or a rash desire to punish someone.
Widowed, she lived a monastic life and even took vows as a Franciscan, but later chose to become a Jesuit.
The number of nuns is still way below what it was in the early 1980s when more than a hundred women a year took vows as sisters.
Clement Baseden, who spent two decades in Japan before returning to Australia, said Suzukawa's and Hatori's stories were common among the native Japanese who eventually took vows with the community.
Clossey states that Jesuit novices became "formed scholastics" when they took vows at the end of the novitiate; he also suggests that these men became "spiritual coadjutors" sometime prior to becoming "professed" fathers (27-28).
They often told me they had stopped singing when they took vows and put on the robe, but "to please you," they would sing that one time.
Brunfels belonged to the austere Carthusian order, whose acolytes took vows of silence and solitude.
A learned and highly regarded figure, Nogarola was quite unusual, for she neither married nor took vows, but instead lived alone in the households of her brothers, where she devoted herself to the study of humanist works and Biblical and patristic texts, eventually earning the reputation of a holy woman (although it is not known whether she in fact entered any kind of religious retreat) (102).
Once again the reader learns a great deal beyond what the Scriptures reveal--for instance, that the couple whose wedding Jesus and Mary attended at Cana took vows of perpetual chastity immediately after the miracle of the water turned into wine.