take the wind out of (one's) sails

(redirected from took the wind out of his sails)

take the wind out of (one's) sails

1. To diminish one's enthusiasm, excitement, or positive outlook (about something). She thought she'd won, but when I told her the letter was a scam, it really took the wind out of her sails. It took the wind out of his sails to learn that nearly half of his bonus would go to taxes.
2. To deprive one of an advantage; to make a situation unfavorable or detrimental for one. The crowd's deafening applause for the home team took the wind out of their opponents' sails. Learning that the boss was letting Jenny give a proposal for the project as well really took the wind out of my sails.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind

take the wind out of someone's sails

Fig. to challenge someone's boasting or arrogance. John was bragging about how much money he earned until he learned that most of us make more. That took the wind out of his sails. Learning that one has been totally wrong about something can really take the wind out of one's sails.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind

take the wind out of one's sails

Hamper or stop one, put one at a disadvantage, as in When they announced they were doing the same study as ours, it took the wind out of our sails , or The applause for the concertmaster took the wind out of the conductor's sails. This expression alludes to sailing to windward of another ship, thereby robbing it of wind for its sails. [Early 1800s]
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind

take the wind out of someone's sails

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

take the wind out of someone's sail

AMERICAN
If something takes the wind out of your sails, it makes you suddenly feel much less confident or determined in what you are doing or saying. The disappointment of that defeat took the wind out of our sails for a while. She suddenly apologized and it took the wind out of my sails. He missed the shot and it seemed to take a little wind out of his sail.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind

take the wind out of someone's sails

frustrate a person by unexpectedly anticipating an action or remark.
1977 Eva Figes Nelly's Version She could so easily have taken the wind out of my sails and put me in my place for good.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind

take the ˈwind out of somebody’s sails

(informal) make somebody suddenly less confident or angry, especially when you do or say something that they do not expect: When he just smiled and agreed with her, it rather took the wind out of her sails.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind

take the wind out of (one's) sails

To rob of an advantage; deflate.
See also: of, out, sail, take, wind
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