to windward


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Related to to windward: Windward Islands

to windward of (something)

obsolete To or into a more advantageous position in respect of something or some situation. An allusion to sailing (in which it is still used literally), in which it is most advantageous to be on or toward the side from which the wind is blowing. The company's many lawyers have ensured that it remains to windward of the new tax laws.
See also: of, windward

to windward

Toward an advantageous position, as in We were hoping to get to windward of the situation. This expression transfers the nautical meaning of the phrase, "move in the direction from which the wind blows," to other kinds of undertaking. Its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: windward

to windward

Into or to an advantageous posture or position.
See also: windward
References in classic literature ?
On the row to windward they always gained on us, so that they were half-way down the ship's side on the row to leeward when we were passing the bow.
At daylight, with Pitcairn three miles to windward, Captain Davenport made out two canoes coming off to him.
You are up to windward now, and you'd better keep off a few points.
Captain Davenport was murmuring as his ship forged clear; but he broke off abruptly to gaze at the shoal which should have been dead astern, but which was already on the PYRENEES' weather-quarter and working up rapidly to windward.
Fifteen days later, two thousand miles farther off, the Helvetia, of the Compagnie-Nationale, and the Shannon, of the Royal Mail Steamship Company, sailing to windward in that portion of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, respectively signalled the monster to each other in 42@ 15' N.
A gorgeous display of color photos throughout makes VOYAGES TO WINDWARD an exciting visual display, spiced with high adventure and not a few practical tips.