to the teeth


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Related to to the teeth: Wisdom teeth

to the teeth

To the greatest degree or extent; extremely, completely, or utterly. I know it takes me a long time getting ready, but nothing feels better than being dressed to the teeth for a night out on the town. Everyone in the bar was armed to the teeth, so we felt a little bit nervous sitting down for a drink in there. I have to say, I'm fed up to the teeth with all the people littering on campus!
See also: teeth

to the teeth

1. Completely, fully, as in Obviously new to skiing, they were equipped to the teeth with the latest gear. This idiom dates from the late 1300s. Also see armed to the teeth; fed to the gills.
2. Also, up to the or one's teeth . Fully committed, as in We're in this collaboration up to our teeth. [First half of 1900s] Both of these hyperbolic usages allude to being fully covered or immersed in something up to one's teeth.
See also: teeth

to the teeth

Lacking nothing; completely: armed to the teeth; dressed to the teeth.
See also: teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
Any child or adult who is engaged in organized sporting activities which may result in contact with another athlete during the activity should wear a mouth guard to prevent injuries to the teeth and supporting soft tissues.
The primary function is to prevent injury to the teeth, temporomandibular joints and soft tissues; even more important, it has been demonstrated that concussion injuries to the brain can be prevented by wearing a mouth guard.
The most severe injury to the teeth is the avulsion, occurring when the tooth has been knocked out of the mouth.
If the initial repair was made at an emergency facility or while away from the area, please be sure to tell your dentist that the person has had a traumatic injury to the teeth.
No one knows whether phytoliths routinely attach to the teeth of living animals, says Mark Teaford of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
Judging from the shallow roots to the teeth and the shape of the notches, Mitchell says the whale could not have eaten by gripping, piercing or tearing its prey.