to heel


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to heel

Into a position of subjugation, discipline, or submission to one's authority. (Used chiefly in the phrases "bring/call someone to heel.") The CEO was quick to call the junior board member to heel after the latter spoke out of turn at the annual general meeting. Sir, the members of your squad are all out of control. You need to bring them to heel right away!
See also: heel

to heel

1. Close behind someone, as in The dog started chasing the car but Miriam called him to heel. This expression is used almost solely in reference to dogs. The heel in this idiom, first recorded in 1810, is the person's.
2. Under control or discipline, as in By a series of surprise raids the police brought the gang members to heel. This expression alludes to controlling a dog by training it to follow at one's heels. [Late 1800s]
See also: heel

to heel

1. Close behind: The hound followed his master to heel.
2. Under discipline or control: The army swiftly brought the rebels to heel.
See also: heel
References in periodicals archive ?
I agree absolutely with Victoria Beckham when she says that when it comes to heels it's 'no pain, no gain'," said Mia, who even wore Christian Louboutins as she was taken to hospital to give birth to Atlanta-Rayne, nine, and Sebastien, six.
For softer and smoother skin, push the stick up and apply daily to heels, feet, or any rough, dry patches such as elbows, knees or hands.
TECHNIQUE: Take 6-inch step in direction of the slant; balance-up on second step, penetrate to heels of offensive lineman; rip with backside arm; keep slantside ready to arm-off and redirect; keep shoulders square.
I'd tell people who aren't used to heels to buy only soft leather shoes and get sponge soles.
And that's to work and for work - not just wearing sneakers on the street and changing to heels in the office.