to burn


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to burn

In great amounts: They had money to burn.
See also: burn
References in classic literature ?
So he takes his bow and arrows, and getting on horseback, he rides away from our rear directly, as it were back to Nertsinskay; after this he takes a great circuit about, and comes directly on the army of the Tartars as if he had been sent express to tell them a long story that the people who had burned the Cham Chi-Thaungu were gone to Sibeilka, with a caravan of miscreants, as he called them--that is to say, Christians; and that they had resolved to burn the god Scal-Isar, belonging to the Tonguses.
The lieutenant has no such orders to give you, and he shall be placed under arrest, instead of you, if he has really commanded you to burn this gentleman.
The plant was designed to burn a combination of coal and the city's trash.
The fire continued to burn downward and by August had reached the network of old mine tunnels beneath the town.
took that position in the Virginia Supreme Court's minority opinion, writing, "The First Amendment does not permit a person to burn a cross in a manner that intentionally places another person in fear of bodily harm.
Many forests--and all their trees--are supposed to burn up every 100 to 500 years according to Mother Nature's plan.
And if your workout is generally at a higher intensity, you may have wondered whether you may be running too fast to burn fat.
After the raging 1988 Yellowstone National Park fires, which were ignited by lightning and allowed to burn by foresters, public sentiment opposed let-it-burn and prescribed burning practices.
This trial indicates that Argidene(TM) Gel may provide a significant advantage over standard therapy in accelerating the time to healing, increasing the percent of burn wound closure and reducing the number of skin grafts to burn treatment sites.
Just as a fire needs oxygen-bearing air to burn, all rocket fuels require an oxidizer for combustion.
Now, decades after the 1910 fires, many of our forests are tinderboxes waiting to burn.
Basically, what we do here is to burn out the competition for the poppies,'' said Randy Burt, an environmental services intern for the California Parks Department.
It's a classic example of the 40 million acres of fire-adapted ecosystem that are going to burn," Stutler said, referring to a January 2000 Forest Service study that predicted burning in areas where fire has been suppressed for years.
It's better to allow it to burn when we have control of it.